TweetFollow Us on Twitter

Nagios on OS X, Part 2

Volume Number: 22 (2006)
Issue Number: 2
Column Tag: Programming

Patch Panel

Nagios on OS X, Part 2

by John C. Welch

Setting Up Nagios 2.0

Since part one of this article was published, there have been some changes in Nagios, (the reasons behind the delay for part two in fact.) Nagios 2 has reached the release candidate stage, and as such, I felt that this part should deal with what (should) be the current version by the time you read this. Luckily, this doesn't really change anything in part 1 other than the version of Nagios you download and install, and one minor change for the configure step of installing Nagios.

Addendum and Errata

The change involves an additional group, the nagios command group. I use nagioscmd for the name of this group, and you create it as you did the nagios group in part 1. This brings us to a rather obvious error in part one, and one I should have caught. The configure command in part one is incorrect, and if it works at all, will give you an incorrect setup. With Nagios 2 in mind, the correct configure command is:

./configure --with-gd-lib=/opt/local/lib --with-gd-inc=/opt/local/include 
   --prefix=/usr/local/nagios --with-cgiurl=/cgi-bin --with-htmlurl=/ --with-nagios-user=nagios 
   --with-nagios-group=nagios --with-command-group=nagioscmd

That should work correctly for you. The rest of part one should be unchanged for you, it has been for me.

Initial Configuration

One change in Nagios 2, and one that will be welcomed by administrators new to Nagios is the initial configuration. In Nagios 1.2 and later, you had to use multiple configuration files, and getting them set up, and grasping the relationship between them was a little tricky. With Nagios 2, if you're new to Nagios, or you want to play with a smaller setup before you get into mapping the entire Internet, you can now use a much smaller number of config files (around 3 for a minimal configuration). In fact, you have your choice of two templates to work from, one called "minimal.cfg-sample" and one called "bigger.cfg.sample". As the names imply, they are for minimal, and slightly bigger Nagios setups.

In case I haven't done this, let me stress one critical point: This article is not, nor should it be taken as a replacement for the Nagios documentation! That documentation is far more complete, and if this article disagrees with the Nagios docs, the Nagios docs should be assumed to be more correct, unless they are assuming !Mac OS X.

The Config Files

As I have alluded to, Nagios makes use of text config files for its setup and to do its work. They can seem daunting at first, but they do follow a logical flow and they should not intimidate you in the least. When you initially install the config files, they all have the name pattern of <something>.cfg-sample. When you have a file set up as you like, remove the -sample from the end of the name, and Nagios will be able to use it. Note that in general, any changes to a config file will probably require a restart of the Nagios process for those changes to be used.

Basic Nagios config theory

Before we get into specifics of the files, we need to look at the relationship of things in Nagios, so that we might have a better mental picture of what's going on. The basic 'unit' in Nagios is the host. A host is a computer, a router, switch, etc. It's anything that Nagios directly probes. Each host has a series of characteristics, like IP address, and name that define it to Nagios. Since you can have hundreds, if not thousands of hosts in a network, and applying settings and services to them individually would be rather tedious, you have hostgroups. Hostgroups are just what they sound like, a collection of hosts that allow you to more easily work with hosts. So you can apply a probe to a single hostgroup instead of 300 hosts. Easier, no?

Now, since in addition to monitoring, we have to notify people we have contacts. Contacts are the human versions of hosts. You can use email, paging, whatever method you can script Nagios to use to notify contacts. As we'll see, you can also set up working hours and non-working hours for notifications too, so non-critical notifications aren't paging people at 2am. Like hostgroups, we have contactgroups, since in larger organizations, you may have quite a few people who need to receive notifications from the same host or hostgroup.

The actual probes Nagios uses are checkcommands, and that's what determines the information that Nagios checks. However, you don't directly apply the checkcommands, rather you use services, which use the checkcommand definition, and other parameters to probe host(groups). This makes it easier to have many checks per host.

Another basic concept is the dependency. This can be used to make sure that you're not getting spurious alerts. For example, if you have a monitored switch that has 24 monitored hosts connected to it and the switch goes down, you'd potentially get alerts from all 25 hosts and however many services are being monitored on each host. If the switch is down, you can't talk to the hosts anyway, so those alerts are somewhat useless, as what they're really telling you is that the hosts are unreachable, not that they're actually malfunctioning. So, we use dependencies to say "If Switch A is down/unreachable, don't bother me with alerts from its attached hosts." You can have both service and host dependencies, and both are critical to a happy Nagios installation.

Finally we have extended info, for both hosts and services which can be thought of as metadata. This is useful for things like 3-D icons, connecting Nagios to various graphing utilities, etc.

nagios.cfg

The nagios.cfg file is the heart of Nagios. Without it, nothing works. So, understanding it is critical. Luckily, while it's long, it's really pretty simple, and well-documented. (I really have to put in a commendation to the Nagios team for their documentation. It's an excellent example of how to do useful documentation, and far more projects, commercial and open source both could do well to learn from Nagios' example.)

The nagios.cfg file is really a listing of other configuration files and settings that apply to Nagios as a whole. For example this line:

log_file=/usr/local/nagios/var/nagios.log

Tells Nagios where its log file lives. That's the default from a new Nagios installation. Going down nagios.cfg, we see the entries for the checkcommands file, the misccommands file, and the minimal.cfg file, which is the very basic Nagios configuration file, and handy for new users. As you go down the list, we see that you can get quite complex with the configuration files, giving you the flexibility to grow your Nagios installation to as large as you need to be. (At the high end, you can have clusters of Nagios servers all talking to each other. We're not going to get into those here.)

Other entries in nagios.cfg include the user and group Nagios runs as, and whether external commands are to be used. (note that to use the Web interface, you have to set check_external_commands=1 in nagios.cfg) One of the nicest things about Nagios is that pretty much every entry in nagios.cfg is nicely commented, so you don't have to guess at what any of them does. Since this is just a basic intro to Nagios, we only need to enable external commands. We'll leave the rest alone.

minimal.cfg

This file is (obviously) a minimal config file that will let you get Nagios up and running with a minimum of work. While it's not going to be one you'll want to use for large installations, it has everything you need to get started.

The first section defines time periods, (can be separately defined in timeperiods.cfg). While minimal.cfg only defines the "24x7" time period, you can create others to suit your own needs, (working_hours, non_working_hours, weekends, etc). The syntax is pretty self explanatory; a 'define timeperiod' block, containing a name used by other config files, an alias that can be more descriptive, contain spaces, etc, and the days in the timeperiod with hours, in 24hr time, that each day covers in the timeperiod, one per line. You can create more if you like, or just use the 24x7 one.

The next section defines the commands Nagios uses to talk to hosts and hostgroups, (can be separately defined in checkcommands.cfg and misccommands.cfg. misccommands is used for things like notification commands and other commands that don't directly use a nagios command plugin). This is where you define the commands that make up services. Looking at this section, we see the checkcommands.cfg file has some commands already set up. We'll skip down past the first two notification commands, to the check-host-alive command, as it's simpler to explain. The basic syntax is simple:

# Command to check to see if a host is "alive" (up) by pinging it--
a comment for your use
define command{ 
--start the command definition block
   command_name   check-host-alive --the name you refer to the command
-- as in the rest of Nagios
   command_line   $USER1$/check_ping -H $HOSTADDRESS$ -w 99,99% -c 100,100% -p 1 
--the actual command
   }

The command string is pretty straightforward. The $USER1$ macro, defined in resource.cfg, is the path to the plugin directory, normally /usr/local/nagios/libexec. You can use the $USERx$ macros to define all kinds of commands, like SNMP community strings, etc. You can have up to 32 of them, and they make life a lot easier. The check_tcp is the actual command executable name, (in general, Nagios command plugins are of the form check_<functionname>.), followed by various switches. A common one is the "-H" switch, which is the host address. Rather than entering it manually for every host, we use the $HOSTADDRESS$, which is defined in the host entry for minimal.cfg, and we'll see that in a bit. The rest of the switches are command-specific, and are explained by the commands help function. You can bring this up in terminal by running /usr/local/nagios/libexec/commandname -h in Terminal, and this will bring up the command's syntax definitions. I've yet to run into a command where this didn't work. Before using a command on a host or hostgroup, it's a good idea to use -h to make sure you know how the command works and what it is going to tell you.

Next up is the contact definition, (also defined by contacts.cfg), which tells Nagios who to notify when it needs to. Since minimal.cfg is by design a simple setup file, there's only one entry here, although you can put more in if you like. The contact_name is how you refer to the contact in the rest of Nagios, the alias is there for more human-friendly labeling. Note that you have separate host and service notification periods. While they're the same in this default, there are cases where you may want them to be different. For example, a backup service that only runs on the weekends wouldn't need 24x7 monitoring, but the host it runs on would. So you could set up a "backup_admin" contact that only received service notifications during a "weekend" time period.

The service and host notification options lines are nothing but a set of switches defined thusly:

    d = send notifications on a DOWN state

    u = send notifications on an UNREACHABLE state

    r = send notifications on recoveries (OK state)

    f = send notifications when the host starts and stops flapping

    n = no host notifications will be sent out

    w = send notifications on a WARNING state

    u = send notifications on an UNKNOWN state

    c = send notifications on a CRITICAL state

Note that "u" can have different definitions depending what kind of notifications you have. "Flapping" is the Nagios definition for a host that is changing states too often. To avoid this you can enable and configure "flap detection" in nagios.cfg. Flap detection can be quite useful if you have a balky host or service, or if you're having other problems causing hosts or services to look like they're coming up and down a lot.

The service_notification_commands and host_notification_commands lines are how you need to be notified for service and host alerts, (email in this case), and then you have a line for the email address you wish to use for the notifications.

The Contact Groups section follows, (defined separately in contactgroups.cfg), and is, obviously, where you create contact groups. The syntax is similar to the contacts configuration, (you'll note that Nagios uses as many common terms as possible in its config files, which makes things much easier on you) with the "members" line being a comma-delimited list of contacts that will be notified when that particular contact group is notified.

Next up is the Hosts section, (defined separately in hosts.cfg). This is the section where you tell Nagios what to monitor. The host definition has, by necessity, a largish list of terms, even in minimal.cfg:

define host{
   use                     generic-host; Name of host template to use
   host_name               localhost
   alias                   localhost
   address                 127.0.0.1
   hostgroups              test
   check_command           check-host-alive
   max_check_attempts      10
   notification_interval   120
   notification_period     24x7
   notification_options    d,r
   contact_groups          admins
        }

The use line tells the defintion which template to use, in this case, "generic-host", defined just above the host definitions in minimal.cfg. The templates are handy for defining values that are going to be common to a host or group of hosts, (not a hostgroup), so that your host definitions don't have to be needlessly long.

The host_name is how you refer to the host in the rest of Nagios, the alias is for a more human-friendly label. The address is what is used by the $HOSTADDRESS$ macro we saw in the command definitions earlier. It can be a FQDN DNS name, or an IP address. For servers, I prefer the IP address wherever possible, since that way, the DNS service on my network dropping doesn't kill Nagios' ability to find hosts. One line not in the default, but that I included here is hostgroups. You can, if you like, define a host's hostgroups in the host definition or a separate hostgroup definition. I recommend picking one and sticking with it to avoid confusion. The check_command line is a single command that you can use as the basic "is it up or not command". This isn't where you set up all the services you check on a host, we'll look at that later. This is just a default command for a given host. max_check_attempts is how many times Nagios will retry the check_command if the result is anything other than OK. (This only applies to the check command in the host definition, not all services running against that host).

notification_interval is how many time units, (default is minutes) that Nagios will wait to send out notifications of a host that is still down or unreachable. That's continuously down. If the host goes up and comes back down, that's different. notification_period is the timeperiod that notifications for this host are allowed, and use the timeperiod(s) set by you. notification_options determine the conditions that notifications are sent out. Usually, you want at least d,r, so that you know when a host goes down, and if it comes back up by itself. contact_groups are self-evident, they're the groups who get notified. If you want multiple contact groups, then use a comma-delimited list. Please note that this example is not a complete list of host parameters by any means, and you should consult the Nagios documentation for a full list.

Since we just defined the host, we should next define the host group the host belongs to, and that's the next section, (separately in hostgroups.cfg):

define hostgroup{
   hostgroup_name    test
   alias             Test Servers
   members           localhost
        }

As you can see, hostgroups look a lot like contact groups. The members parameter is a comma-delimited list of hosts if multiple hosts are used.

The final section in minimal.cfg is services, (defined separately in services.cfg). This is where you really get into the meat of Nagios. Services are how you apply commands to multiple hosts with a single entry, and notify multiple contacts or contact groups. Services can be any command Nagios knows about, and you can get quite specific. For example, while there's no specific command to check the KDC status on OS X Server, I was able to do so by using SNMP to check for the KDC process by using the following command definition:

#check_kdc_process_via_snmp command definition
define command{
        command_name    check_kdc_process_via_snmp
        command_line    $USER1$/check_proc_by_snmp $HOSTADDRESS$ $USER3$ $USER9$
        }

and wrapping it in a service:

define service{
   use   generic-service         ; Name of service template to use
        
   host_name   xserve01
   service_description   SNMP KDC Process Check
   is_volatile   0  
   check_period   24x7
   max_check_attempts   3
   normal_check_interval   3
   retry_check_interval   1
   contact_groups   xserve-admins,nt-admins
   notification_interval   120
   notification_period   24x7
   notification_options   w,u,c,r
   check_command                   check_kdc_process_via_snmp
        }

Like host definitions, service definitions have a template option, so you can set common parameters once and apply them to all the services that use this template. Let's take a look at the default "PING" definition in minimal.cfg:

define service{
   use                     generic-service         
; Name of service template to use
   host_name               localhost
   service_description     PING
   is_volatile             0
   check_period            24x7
   max_check_attempts      4
   normal_check_interval   5
   retry_check_interval    1
   contact_groups          admins
   notification_options    w,u,c,r
   notification_interval   960
   notification_period     24x7
   check_command           check_ping!100.0,20%!500.0,60%
        }

If we compare the service to the host definitions, we see that they're quite similar. The use parameter is the template the definition uses. The host_name paramter is a comma-delimited list of hosts this service runs giants. The max_check_attempts, notification_interval, and notification_periods are the same as for the host definition. The is_volatile parameter normally doesn't apply to services, and should be left at its default unless you have a need to change it. The normal_check_interval setting is how many time units to wait between regular checks of a service. By default, this is set to every five minutes. You can increase the frequency of checks, but this will also increase the load on your server and network, and should be done with caution. The retry_check_interval is how long to wait before scheduling a 're-check' which only happens in the case of a non 'OK' return from a check. The contact_groups parameter is exactly the same as for the host definition. The check_command is the name of the command as defined in the checkcommand definition, and any additional parameters the command needs.

That, in a nutshell is minimal.cfg, and almost all the settings you need to get started with Nagios. However, there are still a couple more files to set up before we're ready to start Nagios and get monitoring.

cgi.cfg

This is the config file that controls how Nagios talks to the CGIs and who can access which CGIs. This file isn't too complicated, but it has to be correct for Nagios' web interface to work correctly. Like all Nagios files, it's well commented. Running down the entries, most are self explanatory, so I won't comment on all of them. One of the ones that can catch you off guard is the url_html_path entry. Remember, with Mac OS X Server, that's going to be the root defined for the site in Server Admin, so you want that to point at the path defined by the physical_html_path parameter just above it.

The use_authentication parameter and the access control sections that follow it are critical, and you really, really want to read the Nagios documentation on how they work. If you are using a lot of external commands that can reboot hosts, etc, (all possible with Nagios), properly configuring your CGI access controls is critical to the security of your Nagios installation.

The statuswrl_include parameter is if you want to create a 3-D VRML 'flythrough' view of your network. It's not really any more useful than any of the 2-D views, but it's pretty cool for corner office types. The rest of the options can be left alone for an initial installation.

Testing Your Configuration

Of course you read all the docs and did everything right, but just in case, Nagios gives you a way to test your config, via the -v option for the nagios executable. The syntax is <path to the nagios executable> -v <path to nagios.cfg>. So for our example, we'd use:

/usr/local/nagios/bin/nagios -v /usr/local/nagios/etc/nagios.cfg

If we did everything right, Nagios will tell us, and we can start it up. If there are config file errors, Nagios will do its best to give you the file name and the line number with the error. This info has always been fairly accurate in my experience, so just look where Nagios tells you, and you should be able to find any errors quickly.

If you didn't get any errors, then let's start nagios as a daemon. This is done by using the -d switch as below:

/usr/local/nagios/bin/nagios -d /usr/local/nagios/etc/nagios.cfg

Once that's done, run top to make sure Nagios is running. If it is, congratulations, you have a working Nagios installation. If not, run Nagios with the -v option to see what you may have missed. Checking system.log can help here as well.

Conclusion

Well, we've gone over a very basic Nagios configuration setup guide, (and corrected some errors from part 1). In the third part of this, we'll take a look at the actual interface, and get an idea of what we're looking at when we check on Nagios, along with some of the email notifications you might get. Thanks!

Bibliography and References

There are two sites that you really must get familiar with to use Nagios. http://www.nagios.org/ is the main Nagios site, and has tons of excellent information for you to use. The other is http://nagiosexchange.org, the biggest collection of Nagios plugins you'll find anywhere.


John Welch jwelch@bynkii.com is Unix/Open Systems administrator for Kansas City Life Insurance, (http://www.kclife.com/) a Technical Strategist for Provar, (http://www.provar.com/) and the "GeekSpeak" segment producer for Your Mac Life, (http://www.yourmaclife.com/). He has over fifteen years of experience at making Macs work with other computer systems. John specializes in figuring out ways in which to make the Mac do what nobody thinks it can, showing that the Mac is a superior administrative platform, and teaching others how to use it in interesting, if sometimes frightening ways. He also does things that don't involve computertry on occasion, or at least that's the rumor.

 

Community Search:
MacTech Search:

Software Updates via MacUpdate

Dropbox 193.4.5594 - Cloud backup and sy...
Dropbox is a file hosting service that provides cloud storage, file synchronization, personal cloud, and client software. It is a modern workspace that allows you to get to all of your files, manage... Read more
Google Chrome 122.0.6261.57 - Modern and...
Google Chrome is a Web browser by Google, created to be a modern platform for Web pages and applications. It utilizes very fast loading of Web pages and has a V8 engine, which is a custom built... Read more
Skype 8.113.0.210 - Voice-over-internet...
Skype is a telecommunications app that provides HD video calls, instant messaging, calling to any phone number or landline, and Skype for Business for productive cooperation on the projects. This... Read more
Tor Browser 13.0.10 - Anonymize Web brow...
Using Tor Browser you can protect yourself against tracking, surveillance, and censorship. Tor was originally designed, implemented, and deployed as a third-generation onion-routing project of the U.... Read more
Deeper 3.0.4 - Enable hidden features in...
Deeper is a personalization utility for macOS which allows you to enable and disable the hidden functions of the Finder, Dock, QuickTime, Safari, iTunes, login window, Spotlight, and many of Apple's... Read more
OnyX 4.5.5 - Maintenance and optimizatio...
OnyX is a multifunction utility that you can use to verify the startup disk and the structure of its system files, to run miscellaneous maintenance and cleaning tasks, to configure parameters in the... Read more
Hopper Disassembler 5.14.1 - Binary disa...
Hopper Disassembler is a binary disassembler, decompiler, and debugger for 32- and 64-bit executables. It will let you disassemble any binary you want, and provide you all the information about its... Read more
WhatsApp 24.3.78 - Desktop client for Wh...
WhatsApp is the desktop client for WhatsApp Messenger, a cross-platform mobile messaging app which allows you to exchange messages without having to pay for SMS. WhatsApp Messenger is available for... Read more
War Thunder 2.33.0.135 - Multiplayer war...
In War Thunder, aircraft, attack helicopters, ground forces and naval ships collaborate in realistic competitive battles. You can choose from over 1,500 vehicles and an extensive variety of combat... Read more
Iridient Developer 4.2 - Powerful image-...
Iridient Developer (was RAW Developer) is a powerful image-conversion application designed specifically for OS X. Iridient Developer gives advanced photographers total control over every aspect of... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

See All

Best iPhone Game Updates: ‘Shoot the Moo...
Hello everyone, and welcome to the week! It’s time once again for our look back at the noteworthy updates of the last seven days. It feels like a bit of a dry spell this week, at least in terms of really interesting updates. I mean, I found some... | Read more »
Celebrate Phobies spooky second annivers...
Get ready to have that classic song stuck in your head, as Phobies celebrates its second anniversary with the release of its latest update; Birthday Bash, Monster Mash. Starting March 5th and lasting for four weeks, it will be a month of... | Read more »
‘Dissidia Final Fantasy Opera Omnia’ Sto...
Square Enix finally shut down Dissidia Final Fantasy Opera Omnia (Free) on iOS and Android last week following the end of service announcement back in November last year. Following the game shutting down, Square Enix | Read more »
‘Monster Hunter Now’ Is Celebrating the...
Niantic and Capcom have begun celebrating the 20th anniversary of Capcom’s best franchise from today inside Monster Hunter Now (Free) on iOS and Android for a limited time. | Read more »
New ‘Warframe Mobile’ Update Adds 60fps...
Warframe Mobile (Free) launched worldwide on iOS just under two weeks ago. I’ve been playing it for review across multiple iOS devices, but have also been picking it up on Steam Deck and Switch to compare. Right from launch, I was impressed with... | Read more »
Passionate About Fidget Toys – The Touch...
In this week’s episode of The TouchArcade Show we kick things off with some passionate discussion about… fidget toys? For some reason? We quickly change gears to talk about the card-based rogulike Balatro, which we’ve both been playing and enjoying... | Read more »
TouchArcade Game of the Week: ‘Flying Ta...
For me Hexage is one of those developers that harkens back to the early days of the App Store and really the beginnings of iPhone gaming. I have spent many collective hours playing the likes of Totemo, Radiant, Radiant Defense, EVAC, Reaper… the... | Read more »
SwitchArcade Round-Up: ‘Ufouria 2: The S...
Hello gentle readers, and welcome to the SwitchArcade Round-Up for March 1st, 2024. In today’s article, we’re looking at the remaining releases of the week. There are a few really good ones today, but the bin bunch certainly isn’t going home hungry... | Read more »
Steam Deck Weekly: Reviews of PowerWash...
Welcome to the first Steam Deck Weekly of March and this week’s edition is bigger than usual. I was a bit unwell last week and had to push some reviews to this week. Alongside that, there have been many notable announcements, releases, and new Steam... | Read more »
10 Under $10: Ten Cheap, Good Nintendo S...
Hello, friends. It’s time yet again for a list of good Nintendo Switch games for reasonable prices. This time around, we’re wading into the extremely crowded waters of the shoot-em-up genre. Per the usual rules, the regular price of the game has to... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Apple discontinues 15-inch M2 MacBook Airs, d...
With today’s introduction of new M3-powered 15″ MacBook Airs, Apple has dropped prices on clearance, Certified Refurbished, 15″ M2 MacBook Airs to a new low of $1019. These are the cheapest 15″... Read more
Price Drop! 13-inch M2 MacBook Airs at Apple...
Apple has dropped prices on Certified Refurbished 13″ M2 MacBook Airs to a new low of $849. These are the cheapest M2-powered MacBooks for sale at Apple. Apple’s one-year warranty is included,... Read more
Apple finally discontinues the 13-inch M1 Mac...
With the introduction of M3-powered 13″ MacBook Airs today, Apple has dropped prices on clearance 13″ M1 MacBook Airs, Certified Refurbished, to $759 for 8-Core CPU/7-Core GPU/256GB models and $929... Read more
Updated Apple iPad Price Trackers
Our Apple award-winning iPad Price Trackers are the best place to find the latest information on iPad sales and deals. We track prices from 20+ Apple retailers, including Apple, Amazon, Best Buy,... Read more
Updated Apple MacBook Price Trackers
Our Apple award-winning MacBook Price Trackers are continually updated with the latest information on prices, bundles, and availability for 16″, 14″, and (recently-discontinued) 13″ MacBook Pros... Read more
Mac Studios with Apple M2 Max and M2 Ultra CP...
B&H Photo has the standard-configuration Mac Studio model with Apple’s M2 Ultra CPU in stock today and on sale for $300 off MSRP, now $3699 (24-Core CPU and 64GB RAM/1TB SSD). B&H Photo has... Read more
Extended: Switch to Verizon and get the Apple...
Verizon has the iPhone 15 on sale for $0 per month when you add a new line if service. Discount is applied to your account monthly over a 36 month term and is valid for the 128GB model. For the first... Read more
Select 16-inch M3 Pro and M3 Max MacBook Pros...
B&H Photo has select 16-inch M3 Pro and M3 Max MacBook Pros on sale for $250 off MSRP. Their prices are the lowest currently available for these configurations. Free 1-2 day shipping is available... Read more
27-inch Apple Studio Displays on sale for $10...
B&H Photo has 27″ Apple Studio Displays on sale for $100 off MSRP today. Free 1-2 day shipping is available to most US addresses: – Studio Display (Standard glass, Tilt stand): $1499 $100 off... Read more
iPad Airs return to their all-time lowest pri...
Best Buy has 10.9″ M1 WiFi iPad Airs on record-low sale prices again for $150 off Apple’s MSRP, starting at $449. Sale prices for online orders only, in-store price may vary. Order online, and choose... Read more

Jobs Board

Teller Part Time *Apple* Valley MN *Apple*...
…is not eligible for Visa sponsorship **Posting Location:** + 15574 Pilot Knod Road Apple Valley, MN 55124 @RWF22 **Posting End Date:** Job posting may come down Read more
*Apple* End User Support Specialist - North...
…that they are performed. + Responsible for support of all College owned Apple computers, mobile ios devices, and peripherals, and for diagnosing and resolving Read more
Omnichannel Associate - *Apple* Blossom Mal...
Omnichannel Associate - Apple Blossom Mall Location:Winchester, VA, United States (https://jobs.jcp.com/jobs/location/191170/winchester-va-united-states) - Apple Read more
Teller Part Time *Apple* Valley MN *Apple*...
…is not eligible for Visa sponsorship **Posting Location:** + 15574 Pilot Knod Road Apple Valley, MN 55124 @RWF22 **Posting End Date:** Job posting may come down Read more
Nurse Anesthetist - *Apple* Hill Surgery Ce...
Nurse Anesthetist - Apple Hill Surgery Center WellSpan Medical Group, York, PA | Advanced Practice Providers | Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists | FTE: 1 | Read more
All contents are Copyright 1984-2011 by Xplain Corporation. All rights reserved. Theme designed by Icreon.