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Doing Objects Right

Volume Number: 14 (1998)
Issue Number: 3
Column Tag: Rhapsody

Doing Objects Right

by Andrew C. Stone

Using modular objects with multiple nib files to make evolving your projects easier

One of the most compelling features of writing software is that there are many ways to accomplish the same task. This gives you a large latitude for creativity, but also "the power to run off into the weeds." (I overheard an Apple Engineer using this phrase.) In this article I present some guidelines for creating usable and reusable objects, and provide source for a search and replace panel.

Our Rhapsody-based object draw and web authoring application, Create(tm), has 550 classes, and about 100 user-interface nib (NeXT InterfaceBuilder) files. This highly modular structure makes changing one component trivial and speedy. Because the nib files are loaded only when needed, it also speeds application launching.

Figure 1.

There is always a temptation to add objects directly to your main nib file because its easy to make object connections. But this bloats the main nib and causes the app to take longer to launch. Moreover, it makes multiple documents almost impossible because sometimes you need more than one instance. You also may want to take advantage of loading the nib files only when needed. This article will show you how to write an object with its own independent interface file, and how to write the glue needed to have a menu item bring up that interface. Code is included for a universal text find and replace object, "TextFinder", which can be added to the simple Word Processor from the November 1997 issue of MacTech.

sWord
The entire source of sWord, our simple rich text & graphics word processor.

#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>
@interface WordDelegate : NSObject
{
  id theText;
}
- (void)newText:(id)sender;
- (void)openText:(id)sender;
- (void)saveText:(id)sender;
@end

#import "WordDelegate.h"
@implementation WordDelegate
- (void)newText:(id)sender
{
  [theText setString:@""];
}
- (void)openText:(id)sender
{
  NSOpenPanel *openPanel = [NSOpenPanel openPanel];
  if ([openPanel runModalForTypes:[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"rtf",@"rtfd",NULL]]) {
      [theText readRTFDFromFile:[openPanel filename]];
  }
}
- (void)saveText:(id)sender
{
  NSSavePanel *savePanel = [NSSavePanel savePanel];
  [savePanel setRequiredFileType:@"rtfd"];
  if ([savePanel runModal]) {
    [theText writeRTFDToFile:[savePanel filename] atomically:NO];
  }
}
@end

Tips and Techniques

This article won't go into style issues -- that's a topic for holy wars! However, here are some basic guidelines for developing stand-alone objects that are truly reusable:

1. Every nib file should have an owner object to which you say "+ new:"

This means that a client need know only the object's class name presenting a simple calling interface. By separating the details of the class (such as the nib name) from its use, you obtain a cushion from changes to the object. Then your client code looks like this:

id aCoolObject = [CoolObject new:(NSZone *)zone];

Note that the client determines the memory allocation zone, the NSZone, in which to create the new object by passing it as an argument. You can always pass in "NSDefaultMallocZone()", a function which returns the default memory allocation zone, or "[self zone]", which returns the zone of the calling object.

In our CoolObject's + new: method, we have

+ new:(NSZone *)zone
{
  self = [[CoolObject allocWithZone:zone] init];
  return self;  /* don't ever forget this! */
}

In its -init method, we load the user interface file:

- init
{
  [super init];
  [NSBundle loadNibNamed:@"CoolObject.nib" owner:self];
  /* place initialization code here:*/

  return self;  /* don't ever forget this! */
}

Many objects require only one instance per class. For example, Create uses just one TextFinder object, which brings up the same panel each time. For objects like these, it is more appropriate to create a class method named + sharedInstance, which might look like this:

+ (id)sharedInstance {
  // subclasses need their own instance if both classes are needed:
  static id sharedFindObject = nil;
  // get the real McCoy the first time through:
  if (!sharedFindObject) {
    sharedFindObject = [[self allocWithZone:
            [[NSApplication sharedApplication] zone]] init];
  }
  return sharedFindObject;
}

2. Name your nib file the same as the owner's class name

For each object which has a visual representation, your project directory will have three associated files: the .h, .m, and .nib. (If the nib file is localized, it will reside in English.proj, German.proj, French.proj, etc.)

If the owner's class name coincides with the nib file name, the following generic code will load a nib file based on that class name, using the NSStringFromClass() function:

#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>   /* Everything you need */

- init
{
  // Continue the designated initializer chain:
  [super init];
  // here's a fuller invocation of "loadNibNamed:" which shows the loading of the
  // dictionary with the key-value pair NSOwner, which has a value of "self".
  [NSBundle loadNibFile:[[NSBundle mainBundle] 
    pathForResource:NSStringFromClass([self class]) 
    ofType:@"nib"]
    externalNameTable:[NSDictionary 
      dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:self, @"NSOwner", nil]
    withZone:[self zone]];

  // place other initialization code here
  return self;
}

By making our object a subclass of an object which uses this code to load a nib, we never even have to even write a new line of code -- the nib with the name of our subclass will be loaded automatically.

Apt class naming is one of the most important aspects of creating comprehensible, not reprehensible, code. The name should clearly and concisely describe the object's function. When my custom class is a subclass of an NSObject, I like to include the superclass name in my class name. For example, SliderDualActing descends from NSSlider. Usually, nib owners will descend from NSObject, so they can have more succinct descriptive names, such as AlignPanel, TextFinder, or OpenAccessory.

3. Use the power of Objective C

We would like any text object to be able to use our TextFinder's search and replace functionality, not just our own custom subclasses. Objective C allows us use categories to add methods to existing classes. We can extend NSTextView with a category TextFinderMethods, which contains the search and replace methods. Then any NSTextView in our application will be able to respond to methods like findNext: or findPrevious:.

One note of caution about categories: if you add multiple categories to a class and define a method in more than one category, which method will be used at runtime is undeterminable. Be sure to use categories carefully. Someday categories may be thought of as the Object Oriented GOTO, but they reveal the power of a dynamic runtime system. The full set of methods that we extend the NSTextView class are defined in "NSTextViewTextFinder.m".

Objective C also provides subclassing, which allows us to reuse classes by modifying their functionality to fit specific applications. For example, in specific text objects, we might want to provide the capability to use regular expressions in our search strings. We could subclass TextFinder and modify a few of its methods without having to rework the whole object.

@implementation NSTextView(TextFinderMethods)

- (void)orderFrontFindPanel:(id)sender {
  // no variable is used - instead, we grab the sharedInstance:
  [[TextFinder sharedInstance] orderFrontFindPanel:sender];
}

4. Use the power of the AppKit

Your interface depends on being able to cause various controls (buttons, menu items) to trigger actions in your code. This is easy with the TextFinder object and the TextFinder nib file. We easily can create the necessary connections in the Interface Builder, but now that you've followed my advice to use modular design and have created many individual nib files, how do you connect the menu items defined in the main nib file to targets in other nib files? How do you connect menu items for finding text to the methods defined in the TextFinderMethods category?

The solution is the use of the AppKit's "First Responder" hierarchy.

Figure 2.

In AppKit programs, if a menu item is connected to the "First Responder" stand-in object, then when the menu item is clicked, it sends its message up a hierarchy until it reaches an object which responds to that method. If no object in the hierarchy responds to that message, the menu item automatically will be disabled. Each NSWindow in your application keeps track of which object in its view hierarchy has first responder status. This object gets the first chance to handle messages sent to First Responder. From there, the message is passed to the first responder's superview, through the view hierarchy to the window and then to the window's delegate. If the message has not yet been handled, it then goes to the NSApplication and finally to the NSApplication's delegate.

So, all you have to do is add the method's name (also called "action") to your main nib's First Responder, and connect the menu item to that action. The rest is done automatically by the AppKit objects and the runtime system. Full instructions on adding the TextFinder to an application are the next section of this article.

5. Document the object

Document what your object does and how it should be called. If you commented as you went, the documentation is mostly written. Make your API understandable by clearly explaining instance variables and methods.

6. Don't Panic

I guess this belongs in every list of guidelines! Happy Hacking.

Adding the TextFinder to Your Application

Adding the TextFinder to an existing project, like the simple word processor we built in November 1997, is as easy as adding the TextFinder.subproj to your project, adding the more complete Edit menu available in Interface Builder's Menu palette, and then connecting these menu items with the method names that we have added to the NSTextView. Here's a step-by-step guide:

  1. Download or type in the TextFinder.subproj files.
  2. Open the pWord PB.project file in ProjectBuilder.
  3. Double-Click "Subprojects" which brings up a Open Panel.
  4. Select the "TextFinder.subproj" to add this subproject.

    Figure 3.

  5. Double-Click Interfaces->sWord.nib to launch InterfaceBuilder and load the main nib file.
  6. Select the "Edit" menu item, and choose Delete.

    Figure 4.

  7. Choose the "Menu" section of IB's Palette.
  8. Drag over the "Edit" menu item onto the main menu.

    Figure 5.

    Figure 6.

  9. Now, we must add the new methods that the NSTextView understands to the First Responder stand in object. These are the methods we defined in NSTextViewTextFinder.m such as orderFrontFindPanel:, findNext:, findPrevious:, jumpToSelection:, and scrollToSelection:.
    1. Double-click the First Responder icon to load the Classes subpanel.

      Figure 7.

    2. Click the crossed "Action" icon to reveal the list of actions understood by the First Responder.

      Figure 8.

    3. Choose Classes->New Action, or Return to open a new, untitled action.

      Figure 9.

    4. Rename "myAction:" to, e.g., "orderFrontFindPanel:"
    5. Repeat a-d for each of the other actions.

      Figure 10.

    6. Save your interface file to update the First Responder completely.
  10. Connect the menu items to their corresponding First Responder action by control-dragging from the menu item to the First Responder icon, and then selecting the correct action in IB's.

    Figure 11.

  11. Recompile, and you are done! Type in some words and try out the find/replace.

The Code

The TextFinder.subproj contains TextFinder.h in Headers, TextFinder.m in Classes, NSTextViewTextFinder.m in Other Sources, and TextFinder.nib in Interfaces.

NSTextViewTextFinder.m
This is the glue which makes every text object able to do search and replace. 
These methods extend the original functionality of the NSTextView in order to 
talk to our TextFinder object. Now, you can add the complete "Edit" menu in 
InterfaceBuilder which contains the Find submenu, and it will just work....

#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>
#import "TextFinder.h"

@implementation NSTextView(TextFinderMethods)

- (void)orderFrontFindPanel:(id)sender {
  [[TextFinder sharedInstance] orderFrontFindPanel:sender];
}

- (void)findNext:(id)sender {
  [[TextFinder sharedInstance] findNext:sender];
}
- (void)findPrevious:(id)sender {
  [[TextFinder sharedInstance] findPrevious:sender];
}

- (void)enterSelection:(id)sender {
  NSRange range = [self selectedRange];
  if (range.length) {
    [[TextFinder sharedInstance] setFindString:[[self string] substringWithRange:range]];
  } else {
    NSBeep();
  }
}

- (void)jumpToSelection:(id)sender {
  [self scrollRangeToVisible:[self selectedRange]];
}

- (void)doFindSelection:sender
{
  [self enterSelection:self];
}

@end

TextFinder.h
#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>

#define Forward YES
#define Backward NO

@interface TextFinder : NSObject {
  NSString *findString;
  id findTextField;
  id replaceTextField;
  id ignoreCaseButton;
  id findNextButton;
  id replaceAllScopeMatrix;
  id statusField;
  BOOL findStringChangedSinceLastPasteboardUpdate;
  BOOL lastFindWasSuccessful;
}

/* Common way to get a text finder. One instance of TextFinder per app is 
good enough. */
+ (id)sharedInstance;

/*  Main method for external users; does a find in the first responder. 
  Selects found range or beeps. */
- (BOOL)find:(BOOL)direction;

/* Loads UI lazily */
- (NSPanel *)findPanel;
/* Gets the first responder and returns it if it's an NSTextView */
- (NSTextView *)textObjectToSearchIn;
/* Get/set the current find string. Will update UI if UI is loaded */
- (NSString *)findString;
- (void)setFindString:(NSString *)string;
/* Misc internal methods */
- (void)appDidActivate:(NSNotification *)notification;
- (void)addWillDeactivate:(NSNotification *)notification;
- (void)loadFindStringFromPasteboard;
- (void)loadFindStringToPasteboard;

/* Methods sent from the find panel UI */
- (void)findNext:(id)sender;
- (void)findPrevious:(id)sender;
- (void)findNextAndOrderFindPanelOut:(id)sender;
- (void)replace:(id)sender;
- (void)replaceAndFind:(id)sender;
- (void)replaceAll:(id)sender;
- (void)orderFrontFindPanel:(id)sender;

@end

@interface NSString (NSStringTextFinding)

- (NSRange)findString:(NSString *)string 
    selectedRange:(NSRange)selectedRange 
    options:(unsigned)mask wrap:(BOOL)wrapFlag;

@end
    

TextFinder.m
Generic Find/Replace functionality for text. Uses new text API.You may freely copy, 
distribute and reuse the code in this example. NeXT disclaims any warranty of 
any kind, expressed or implied, as to its fitness for any particular use.

#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>
#import "TextFinder.h"

@implementation TextFinder

- (id)init {
  // if there are memory allocation problems, we bail and return nil: 
  if (!(self = [super init])) return nil;

  // in order share find strings among applications, 
  // we'll register for notifications when the app activates or deactivates: 
  [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] 
    addObserver:self selector:@selector(appDidActivate:) 
    name:NSApplicationDidBecomeActiveNotification 
    object:[NSApplication sharedApplication]];
  [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
    selector:@selector(addWillDeactivate:) 
    name:NSApplicationWillResignActiveNotification 
    object:[NSApplication sharedApplication]];

  // initialize ourselves to the empty string: 
  [self setFindString:@""];
  
  // here we grab the last used findstring from other apps: 
  [self loadFindStringFromPasteboard];
  return self;
}

// these are the methods called whenever we get an activate or deactivate 
// notification: 

- (void)appDidActivate:(NSNotification *)notification {
  [self loadFindStringFromPasteboard];
}

- (void)addWillDeactivate:(NSNotification *)notification {
  [self loadFindStringToPasteboard];
}

// and here is the workhorse code for sharing the findstrings among apps: 

- (void)loadFindStringFromPasteboard {
  NSPasteboard *pasteboard = [NSPasteboard 
                    pasteboardWithName:NSFindPboard];
  if ([[pasteboard types] containsObject:NSStringPboardType]) 
  {
    NSString *string = [pasteboard 
      stringForType:NSStringPboardType];
    if (string && [string length]) {
      [self setFindString:string];
      findStringChangedSinceLastPasteboardUpdate = NO;
    }
  }
}

- (void)loadFindStringToPasteboard {
  NSPasteboard *pasteboard = [NSPasteboard 
                    pasteboardWithName:NSFindPboard];
  if (findStringChangedSinceLastPasteboardUpdate) {
    [pasteboard declareTypes:[NSArray 
      arrayWithObject:NSStringPboardType] owner:nil];
    [pasteboard setString:[self findString] 
      forType:NSStringPboardType];
    findStringChangedSinceLastPasteboardUpdate = NO;
  }
}

// Only one of the TextFinder objects is ever required: 
static id sharedFindObject = nil;

+ (id)sharedInstance {
  if (!sharedFindObject) {
    sharedFindObject = [[self allocWithZone:[[NSApplication 
                          sharedApplication] zone]] init];
  }
  return sharedFindObject;
}

- (void)loadUI {
  // we check to see if the findTextField ivar is nil, if so, we load the nib: 
  if (!findTextField) {
    if (![NSBundle loadNibNamed:@"TextFinder" owner:self]) {
      NSLog(@"Failed to load TextFinder.nib");
      NSBeep();
    }
    // here we automatically remember the user's last location of the find panel: 
    if (self == sharedFindObject) 
      [[findTextField window] setFrameAutosaveName:@"Find"];
  }
  // now update the search string: 
  [findTextField setStringValue:[self findString]];
}

- (void)dealloc {
  // don't litter 
  if (self != sharedFindObject) {
    [findString release];
    [super dealloc];
  }
}

- (NSString *)findString {
  return findString;
}

- (void)setFindString:(NSString *)string {
  // only change if different: 
  if ([string isEqualToString:findString]) return;
  // careful memory management is what makes a good programmer! 
  [findString autorelease];
  // keep a copy around: 
  findString = [string copyWithZone:[self zone]];
  if (findTextField) {
    [findTextField setStringValue:string];
    [findTextField selectText:nil];
  }
  // here we note that we haven't set the global pasteboard string yet: 
  findStringChangedSinceLastPasteboardUpdate = YES;
}

// this method tries to find the NSText object that is active
// it will return nil if none is active: 

- (NSTextView *)textObjectToSearchIn {
  id obj = [[NSApp mainWindow] firstResponder];
  return (obj && [obj isKindOfClass:[NSText class]]) 
            ? obj : nil;
}
- (NSPanel *)findPanel {
  if (!findTextField) [self loadUI];
  return (NSPanel *)[findTextField window];
}

/* The primitive for finding; this ends up setting the status field (and beeping if 
necessary)... */
- (BOOL)find:(BOOL)direction {
  NSTextView *text = [self textObjectToSearchIn];

  lastFindWasSuccessful = NO;
  if (text) {
    NSString *textContents = [text string];
    unsigned textLength;
    if (textContents && (textLength = [textContents length])) {
      NSRange range;
      unsigned options = 0;
_  if (direction == Backward) options |= NSBackwardsSearch;
      if ([ignoreCaseButton state]) 
        options |= NSCaseInsensitiveSearch;
      range = [textContents findString:[self findString] 
                selectedRange:[text selectedRange] 
                options:options wrap:YES];
      if (range.length) {
        [text setSelectedRange:range];
        [text scrollRangeToVisible:range];
        lastFindWasSuccessful = YES;
      }
    }
  }
  if (!lastFindWasSuccessful) {
    NSBeep();
    [statusField setStringValue:NSLocalizedStringFromTable(
      @"Not found", @"FindPanel", 
      @"Status displayed in find panel when the find string \
      is not found.")];
  } else {
    [statusField setStringValue:@""];
  }
  return lastFindWasSuccessful;
}

- (void)orderFrontFindPanel:(id)sender {
  NSPanel *panel = [self findPanel];
  [findTextField selectText:nil];
  [panel makeKeyAndOrderFront:nil];
}

/** * ** * Action methods for gadgets in the find panel; these should all end up 
setting or clearing the status field ** * ** * /

- (void)findNextAndOrderFindPanelOut:(id)sender {
  [findNextButton performClick:nil];
  if (lastFindWasSuccessful) {
    [[self findPanel] orderOut:sender];
  } else {
    [findTextField selectText:nil];
  }
}

- (void)findNext:(id)sender {
  if (findTextField) 
    /* findTextField should be set */
    [self setFindString:[findTextField stringValue]];
  (void)[self find:Forward];
}

- (void)findPrevious:(id)sender {
  if (findTextField) 
    /* findTextField should be set */
    [self setFindString:[findTextField stringValue]];
  (void)[self find:Backward];
}

- (void)replace:(id)sender {
  NSTextView *text = [self textObjectToSearchIn];
  if (!text) {
    NSBeep();
  } else {
    [[text textStorage] 
      replaceCharactersInRange:[text selectedRange] 
      withString:[replaceTextField stringValue]];
    [text didChangeText];
  }
  [statusField setStringValue:@""];
}

- (void)replaceAndFind:(id)sender {
  [self replace:sender];
  [self findNext:sender];
}
#define ReplaceAllScopeEntireFile 42
#define ReplaceAllScopeSelection 43

- (void)replaceAll:(id)sender {

  NSTextView *text = [self textObjectToSearchIn];

  if (!text) {
    NSBeep();
  } else {
    NSString *textContents = [text string];
    BOOL entireFile = replaceAllScopeMatrix 
          ? ([replaceAllScopeMatrix selectedTag] 
            == ReplaceAllScopeEntireFile) : YES;
    NSRange replaceRange = entireFile 
          ? NSMakeRange(0, [[text textStorage] length]) 
          : [text selectedRange];
    unsigned options = NSBackwardsSearch 
          | ([ignoreCaseButton state] 
          ? NSCaseInsensitiveSearch : 0);
    unsigned replaced = 0;
    if (findTextField) 
      [self setFindString:[findTextField stringValue]];

    [[text textStorage] beginEditing];
    while (1) {
      NSRange foundRange = [textContents 
              rangeOfString:[self findString] 
              options:options range:replaceRange];
      if (foundRange.length == 0) break;
      replaced++;
      [[text textStorage] replaceCharactersInRange:foundRange 
        withString:[replaceTextField stringValue]];
      replaceRange.length 
        = foundRange.location - replaceRange.location;
    }
    [[text textStorage] endEditing];
    [text didChangeText];
    if (replaced == 0) {
      NSBeep();
      [statusField setStringValue:NSLocalizedStringFromTable(
        @"Not found", @"FindPanel", 
        @"Status displayed in find panel when the find \
        string is not found.")];
    } else {
      [statusField setStringValue:[NSString   
        localizedStringWithFormat: 
        NSLocalizedStringFromTable(@"%d replaced", 
          @"FindPanel", @"Status displayed in find panel \
          when indicated number of matches are replaced."), 
          replaced]];
    }
  }
}

@end

@interface NSString (StringTextFinding)
- (NSRange)findString:(NSString *)string 
    selectedRange:(NSRange)selectedRange 
    options:(unsigned)options wrap:(BOOL)wrap;

@end

@implementation NSString (StringTextFinding)

- (NSRange)findString:(NSString *)string 
    selectedRange:(NSRange)selectedRange 
    options:(unsigned)options wrap:(BOOL)wrap {
  BOOL forwards = (options & NSBackwardsSearch) == 0;
  unsigned length = [self length];
  NSRange searchRange, range;

  if (forwards) {
    searchRange.location = NSMaxRange(selectedRange);
    searchRange.length = length - searchRange.location;
    range = [self rangeOfString:string options:options 
              range:searchRange];
    if ((range.length == 0) && wrap) {
      /* If not found look at the first part of the string */
      searchRange.location = 0;
      searchRange.length = selectedRange.location;
      range = [self rangeOfString:string options:options 
                range:searchRange];
    }
  } else {
    searchRange.location = 0;
    searchRange.length = selectedRange.location;
    range = [self rangeOfString:string options:options 
              range:searchRange];
    if ((range.length == 0) && wrap) {
      searchRange.location = NSMaxRange(selectedRange);
      searchRange.length = length - searchRange.location;
      range = [self rangeOfString:string options:options 
                range:searchRange];
    }
  }
  return range;
}

@end

Andrew Stone, an early HyperTalk developer and coauthor of "Tricks of the HyperTalk Masters" emigrated to the NEXT community in 1989, going on to write such NeXT classics as TextArt, Create, DataPhile and 3Dreality.

 

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Yoko Taro and developer Pokelabo's SINoALICE has now opened for pre-registration over on the App Store. It's already amassed 1.5 million Android pre-registrations, and it's currently slated to launch on July 1st. [Read more] | Read more »
Masketeers: Idle Has Fallen's lates...
Masketeers: Idle Has Fallen is the latest endeavour from Appxplore, the folks behind Crab War, Thor: War of Tapnarok and Light A Way. It's an idle RPG that's currently available for Android in Early Access and will head to iOS at a later date. [... | Read more »
Evil Hunter Tycoon celebrates 2 million...
Evil Hunter Tycoon has proved to be quite the hit since launching back in March, with its most recent milestone being 2 million downloads. To celebrate the achievement, developer Super Planet has released a new updated called Darkness' Front Yard... | Read more »
Peak's Edge is an intriguing roguel...
Peak's Edge is an upcoming roguelike puzzle game from developer Kenny Sun that's heading for both iOS and Android on June 4th as a free-to-play title. It will see players rolling a pyramid shape through a variety of different levels. [Read more] | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Sams Club Sales Event: $100 off every Apple W...
Sams Club is discounting all Apple Watch Series 5 models by $100 off Apple’s MSRP through June 3, 2020. Choose free shipping or free local store pickup (if available). Sale prices for online orders... Read more
New 16″ MacBook Pros now on sale for up to $2...
Apple reseller DataVision is now offering new 16″ Apple MacBook Pros for up to $255 off MSRP, each including free shipping. Prices start at $2194. DataVision charges sales tax for NY, NJ, PA, and CA... Read more
Apple now offering Certified Refurbished iPho...
Apple is now offering Certified Refurbished iPhone Xr models in the refurbished section of their online store starting at $499. Each iPhone comes with Apple’s standard one-year warranty, ships free,... Read more
Sale! Get a 10.2″ 32GB WiFi iPad for only $27...
Walmart has new 10.2″ 32GB WiFi iPads on sale for $50 off Apple’s MSRP, only $279. These are the same iPads sold by Apple in their retail and online stores. Be sure to select Walmart as the seller... Read more
Apple resellers offer new 2020 Mac minis for...
Apple resellers are offering new 2020 Mac minis for up to $50 off Apple’s MSRP with prices available starting at $759. Shipping is free: (1) B&H Photo: – 2020 4-Core Mac mini: $759 $40 off MSRP... Read more
Sprint is offering the Apple iPhone 11 free t...
Did you miss out on Sprint’s recent free iPhone SE promotion? No worries. Sprint has the 64GB iPhone 11 available for $0 per month for new lines when you trade-in a qualifying phone in any condition... Read more
Apple has clearance 2019 13″ 1.4GHz MacBook P...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2019 13″ 1.4GHz 4-Core Touch Bar MacBook Pros available today starting at $979 and up to $440 off original MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is included, shipping is... Read more
Apple restocks 2019 MacBook Airs starting at...
Apple has clearance, Certified Refurbished, 2019 13″ MacBook Airs available again starting at $779. Each MacBook features a new outer case, comes with a standard Apple one-year warranty, and is... Read more
Apple restocks clearance Mac minis for only $...
Apple has restocked Certified Refurbished 2018 4-Core Mac minis for only $599. Each mini comes with a new outer case plus a standard Apple one-year warranty. Shipping is free: – 3.6GHz Quad-Core... Read more
Apple’s new 2020 13″ MacBook Airs on sale for...
B&H Photo has Apple’s new 2020 13″ 4-Core and 6-Core MacBook Airs on sale today for $50-$100 off Apple’s MSRP, starting at $949. Expedited shipping is free to many addresses in the US. The... Read more

Jobs Board

*Apple* Mac Desktop Support - Global Dimensi...
…Operate and support an Active Directory (AD) server-client environment for all Apple devices operating on the BUMED network + Leverage necessary industry enterprise Read more
Surgical Technologist III, *Apple* Hill Sur...
Surgical Technologist III, Apple Hill Surgical Center - Full Time Tracking Code D5.29.2020 Job Description Surgical Technologist III Apple Hill Surgical Center Read more
Security Officer - *Apple* Store - NANA (Un...
**Security Officer \- Apple Store** **Description** About NMS Built on a culture of safety and integrity, NMSdelivers award\-winning, integrated support services to Read more
Transition Into Practice Program (TIP) - Sept...
…Academy-Transition into Practice (TIP) Residency program at St Mary Medical Center in Apple Valley, CA. **We are seekingRegistered Nurses who are:** + New graduate Read more
Essbase Developer - *Apple* - Theorem, LLC...
Job Summary Apple is seeking an experienced, detail-minded Essbase developer to join our worldwide business development and strategy team. If you are someone who Read more
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