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Feb 96 Challenge
Volume Number:12
Issue Number:2
Column Tag:Programmer’s Challenge

Programmer’s Challenge

By Bob Boonstra, Westford, Massachusetts

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Intersecting Rectangles

The Challenge this month is to write a routine that will accept a list of rectangles and calculate a result based on the intersections of those rectangles. Specifically, your code will return a list of non-overlapping rectangles that contain all points enclosed by an odd (or even) number of the input rectangles. The prototype for the code you should write is:

void RectangleIntersections(
 const Rect inputRects[], /* list if input rectangles */
 const long numRectsIn,   /* number of inputRects */
 Rect outputRects[], /* preallocated storage for output */
 long *numRectsOut,/* number of outputRects returned */
 const Boolean oddParity  /* see text for explanation */
);

The parameter oddParity indicates whether you are to return rectangles containing points enclosed by an odd number of the numRectsIn inputRects rectangles (oddParity==true) or by an even (nonzero) number of rectangles (oddParity==false). Sufficient storage for the output will be preallocated for you and pointed to by outputRects.

As an example, if you were given these inputRects:

 {0,10,20,30}, {5,15,20,30}

and oddParity were true, you might return the following list of outputRects:

 {0,10,5,15}, {0,15,5,30}, {5,10,15,20}

It would also be correct to return a result that combined the first of these rectangles with either of the other two. If oddParity were false, you would return the following list for the example input:

 {5,15,20,30}

The outputRects must be non-empty and non-overlapping. In the example, it would be incorrect to return the following for the odd parity case:

 {0,10,5,30} {0,10,20,15}

The outputRects you generate must also be maximal, in the sense that each edge of each of the outputRects should pass through a vertex of one of the inputRects. That is, for example, I don’t want you to return a 1¥1 rectangle representing each point enclosed in the desired number of inputRects. Before returning, set *numRectsOut to indicate the number of outputRects you generated.

If you need auxiliary storage, you may allocate any reasonable amount within your code using toolbox routines or malloc, but you must deallocate that storage before returning. (No memory leaks! - I’ll be calling your code many times.)

This native PowerPC Challenge will be scored using the latest Metrowerks compiler, with the winner determined by execution time. If you have any questions, or would like some test data for your code, please send me e-mail at one of the Programmer’s Challenge addresses, or directly to bob_boonstra@mactech.com. Test data will also be sent to the Programmer’s Challenge mailing list, which you can join by sending a message to autoshare@mactech.com with the SUBJECT line “sub challenge YourName”, substituting your real name for YourName.

Two Months Ago Winner

Eight of the 13 solutions submitted for the Find Again And Again Challenge worked correctly. Congratulations to Gustav Larsson (Mountain View, CA) for submitting an entry that was significantly faster than the others. The problem was to write a text search engine optimized to operate repeatedly on the same block of text. A variety of optimization techniques were represented in the solutions, a couple of which are highlighted in the table of results below. Several people optimized for the case where the same word was repeatedly searched for. Some of my tests included this case, and those results are in the columns headed “repeat.” The “random” columns shows results for tests that searched for random occurrences of random words. Each of the tests were run under conditions where only 64KB of auxiliary storage was available, and where much more memory was available. These conditions were weighted 20% and 80% respectively in calculating the total time, since the problem statement promised that ample memory would usually be provided. You can see that Gustav’s solution performed reasonably well when memory was scarce, and very well when memory was plentiful.

Gustav’s solution hashes as many words of the input text as possible in the initialization routine. He uses the Boyer-Moore-Horspool algorithm to find words in any text that was not parsed during initialization. Other features of the approach are described in the well-commented code.

Here are the times and code sizes for entries that passed by tests. Numbers in parentheses after a person’s name indicate that person’s cumulative point total for all previous Challenges, not including this one.

64K Memory >>64K Memory code

Name repeat random repeat random time size

Gustav Larsson (67) 1814 3773 62 111 1255 3584

Tom Saxton 46 16400 197 459 3814 2000

Xan Gregg (81) 27 2907 1316 2835 3907 1664

Kevin Cutts (46) 1760 3234 1760 2809 4654 1600

Joseph Ku 8856 14570 121 509 5189 1584

David Cary 60 22665 499 1000 5745 2124

Eric Lengyel (40) 34 10221 29 4697 5831 1188

Ernst Munter (110) 2036 2053 2287 4603 6330 2976

Top Contestants of All time

Here are the Top Contestants for the Programmer’s Challenges to date, including everyone who has accumulated more than 20 points. The numbers below include points awarded for this month’s entrants.

Rank Name Points Rank Name Points

1. [Name deleted] 176 11. Mallett, Jeff 44

2. Munter, Ernst 110 12. Kasparian, Raffi 42

3. Gregg, Xan 88 13. Vineyard, Jeremy 42

4. Larsson, Gustav 87 14. Lengyel, Eric 40

5. Karsh, Bill 80 15. Darrah, Dave 31

6. Stenger, Allen 65 16. Landry, Larry 29

7. Riha, Stepan 51 17. Elwertowski, Tom 24

8. Cutts, Kevin 50 18. Lee, Johnny 22

9. Goebel, James 49 19. Noll, Robert 22

10. Nepsund, Ronald 47

There are three ways to earn points: (1) scoring in the top 5 of any Challenge, (2) being the first person to find a bug in a published winning solution or, (3) being the first person to suggest a Challenge that I use. The points you can win are:

1st place 20 points 5th place 2 points

2nd place 10 points finding bug 2 points

3rd place 7 points suggesting Challenge 2 points

4th place 4 points

Here is Gustav’s winning solution:

Find Again and Again

Copyright © 1995 Gustav Larsson

Constants & Types
#define ALPHABET_SIZE 256
#define ALLOC_SIZE(n) ((n+3) & -4L) /* next multiple of 4 */
#define HASH_BUCKETS 1024           /* must be power of 2 */
#define HASH_MASK (HASH_BUCKETS - 1)
#define NO_NULL_CHAR 'A'
#define NULL 0

typedef unsigned char  uchar;
typedef unsigned short ushort;
typedef unsigned long  ulong;

typedef struct Word Word;
typedef struct Occurrence Occurrence;
typedef struct Private Private;

/* 
  A block of occurrence positions.  We pack in as many occurrences as possible into 
  a single block, from 3 to 6 depending on textLength.

  The first entry in the block is always used.  The remaining entries are in use if they 
  are not zero.  These facts are used several places to simplify the code.
*/
struct Occurrence {
  Occurrence *next;
  union {
    ushort pos2[6];   /* 2 bytes/occurrence */
    struct {
      ushort lo[4];
      uchar  hi[4];
    } pos3;           /* 3 bytes/occurrence */
    long pos4[3];     /* 4 bytes/occurrence */
  } p;
};

/*
  There is one Word struct for each distinct word.  The word’s length is stored in the 
  top eight bits of the hash value.  There’s no need to store the characters in the word 
  since we can just look at the first occurrence (first entry in Word.first).
*/
struct Word {
  Word        *next;
  ulong       hash;
  Occurrence  *last;
  Occurrence  first;
};

/*
  The structure of our private storage.  The hashCodes[] array serves two purposes: it 
  distinguishes alphanumeric from non-alphanumeric characters, and it provides a 
  non-zero hash code for each alphanumeric character.  The endParsedText field will 
  be -1 if there was enough private memory to parse all the text.  Otherwise, it points to 
  the start of the unparsed text.  nullChar is used by the BMH_Search() function when 
  we must search unparsed text for an occurrence.
*/
struct Private {
  ulong hashCodes [ ALPHABET_SIZE ];
  Word  *hashTable [ HASH_BUCKETS ];
  long  endParsedText;  /* start of parsed text */
  long  posBytes;       /* POS_x_BYTES, below */
  char  nullChar;       /* char not appearing in the text */
  long  heap;           /* start of private heap  */
};

Macros
/*
  These macros simplify access to the occurrence positions stored in an Occurrence 
  struct.  Posbytes is a macro argument that is usually set to private->posBytes.  
  However, you can also use a constant for posbytes, which lets the compiler choose 
  the right case at compile time, producing smaller and faster code.
*/
#define POS_2_BYTES 1   /* word position fits in 2 bytes */
#define POS_3_BYTES 0   /* fits in 3 bytes; usual case */
#define POS_4_BYTES 2   /* fits in 4 bytes */

#define GET_POS(pos,occur,index,posbytes)           \
  {                                                 \
    if ( (posbytes) == POS_3_BYTES )                \
      pos = ((long)(occur)->p.pos3.hi[index] << 16) \
          + (occur)->p.pos3.lo[index];              \
    else if ( (posbytes) == POS_2_BYTES )           \
      pos = (occur)->p.pos2[index];                 \
    else                                            \
      pos = (occur)->p.pos4[index];                 \
  }

#define SET_POS(pos,occur,index,posbytes)       \
  {                                             \
    if ( (posbytes) == POS_3_BYTES )            \
    {                                           \
      (occur)->p.pos3.hi[index] = (pos) >> 16;  \
      (occur)->p.pos3.lo[index] = (pos);        \
    }                                           \
    else if ( (posbytes) == POS_2_BYTES )       \
      (occur)->p.pos2[index] = pos;             \
    else                                        \
      (occur)->p.pos4[index] = pos;             \
  }

InitFind
void InitFind (
  char *textToSearch,
  long textLength,
  void *privateStorage,
  long storageSize
)
{
  Private *private = privateStorage;

  private->endParsedText =
    InitFindBody(
        (uchar *)textToSearch,
        textLength,
        privateStorage,
        (uchar *)privateStorage + storageSize
    );

  if ( private->endParsedText != -1 )
    private->nullChar =
      PickNullChar(
            private,
            (uchar *)textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
            (uchar *)textToSearch + textLength );
  else
    private->nullChar = NO_NULL_CHAR;
}

InitFindBody
/*
  This function does most of the work for InitFind().  The arguments have been recast 
  into a more useful form; uchar and ulong are used a lot so that we don’t have to 
  worry about the sign, especially when indexing private->hashCodes[].

  The return value is the character position when the unparsed text begins (if we run 
  out of private storage), or -1 if all the text was parsed.
*/
static long InitFindBody (
  uchar   *textToSearch,
  long    textLength,
  Private *private,
  uchar   *endPrivateStorage
)
{
  uchar       *alloc, *textPos, *textEnd, *wordStart;
  long        wordLength;
  ulong       hash, code;
  Word        *word;
  Occurrence  *occur;

/*
  Init table of hash codes.  The remaining entries are guaranteed to be initialized to 
  zero.  The hash codes were chosen so that any two codes differ by at least five bits.
  */
  {
    ulong *table = private->hashCodes;  /* reduces typing */

    table['0'] = 0xFFC0;  table['5'] = 0xF492;
    table['1'] = 0xFE07;  table['6'] = 0xF31E;
    table['2'] = 0xF98B;  table['7'] = 0xF2D9;
    table['3'] = 0xF84C;  table['8'] = 0xCF96;
    table['4'] = 0xF555;  table['9'] = 0xCE51;

    table['A'] = 0xC9DD;  table['N'] = 0xA245;
    table['B'] = 0xC81A;  table['O'] = 0x9F0A;
    table['C'] = 0xC503;  table['P'] = 0x9ECD;
    table['D'] = 0xC4C4;  table['Q'] = 0x9941;
    table['E'] = 0xC348;  table['R'] = 0x9886;
    table['F'] = 0xC28F;  table['S'] = 0x959F;
    table['G'] = 0xAF5C;  table['T'] = 0x9458;
    table['H'] = 0xAE9B;  table['U'] = 0x93D4;
    table['I'] = 0xA917;  table['V'] = 0x9213;
    table['J'] = 0xA8D0;  table['W'] = 0x6DD3;
    table['K'] = 0xA5C9;  table['X'] = 0x6C14;
    table['L'] = 0xA40E;  table['Y'] = 0x6B98;
    table['M'] = 0xA382;  table['Z'] = 0x6A5F;

    table['a'] = 0x6746;  table['n'] = 0x3C88;
    table['b'] = 0x6681;  table['o'] = 0x3B04;
    table['c'] = 0x610D;  table['p'] = 0x3AC3;
    table['d'] = 0x60CA;  table['q'] = 0x37DA;
    table['e'] = 0x5D85;  table['r'] = 0x361D;
    table['f'] = 0x5C42;  table['s'] = 0x3191;
    table['g'] = 0x5BCE;  table['t'] = 0x3056;
    table['h'] = 0x5A09;  table['u'] = 0x0D19;
    table['i'] = 0x5710;  table['v'] = 0x0CDE;
    table['j'] = 0x56D7;  table['w'] = 0x0B52;
    table['k'] = 0x515B;  table['x'] = 0x0A95;
    table['l'] = 0x509C;  table['y'] = 0x078C;
    table['m'] = 0x3D4F;  table['z'] = 0x064B;
  }

  /*  Determine the number of bytes needed to store each occurrence position. */
  if ( textLength <= 0x10000L )
    private->posBytes = POS_2_BYTES;
  else if ( textLength <= 0x1000000L )
    private->posBytes = POS_3_BYTES;
  else
    private->posBytes = POS_4_BYTES;

  /* Set up variables to handle allocation of private storage. */
  alloc = (uchar *)&private->heap;

  /* Parse the text */
  textPos = textToSearch;
  textEnd = textPos + textLength;

  while ( textPos != textEnd )
  {
    /* Search for start of word */
    while ( private->hashCodes[*textPos] == 0 )
    {
      textPos++;
      if ( textPos == textEnd )
        return -1;  /* parse all text */
    }
    wordStart = textPos;

    /* Search for end of word; generate hash value too */
    hash = 0;
    while ( textPos != textEnd &&
            (code = private->hashCodes[ *textPos ]) != 0 )
    {
      hash = (hash << 1) ^ code;
      textPos++;
    }
    wordLength = textPos - wordStart;
    hash = (hash & 0xFFFFFF) | (wordLength << 24);

    /*
      Record the occurrence.  First we see if a Word struct exists for this word and 
      whether we need to allocate a new Occurrence struct.
    */
    word = LookupWord(
                private,
                (char *)textToSearch,
                (char *)wordStart,
                wordLength,
                hash );
    if ( word )
    {
      long allocateNewBlock, blockSize, i, pos;

      /*
        This word has occurred before, so it already has a Word struct.  See if there’s 
        room in the last Occurrence block for another entry.  Remember that entry #0 in 
        the Occurrence block is always in use, so we can start checking at entry #1 for a 
        non-zero entry.
      */
      occur = word->last;
      allocateNewBlock = TRUE;
      switch ( private->posBytes )
      {
        case POS_2_BYTES:  blockSize = 6; break;
        case POS_3_BYTES:  blockSize = 4; break;
        case POS_4_BYTES:  blockSize = 3; break;
      }

      for ( i = 1; i < blockSize; i++ )
      {
        GET_POS( pos, occur, i, private->posBytes )
        if ( pos == 0 )
        {
          SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, occur, i,
                   private->posBytes )
          allocateNewBlock = FALSE;
          break;
        }
      }

      if ( allocateNewBlock )
      {
        /* Block is full.  Allocate new Occurrence block */
        occur = (Occurrence *) alloc;
        alloc += ALLOC_SIZE( sizeof(Occurrence) );
        if ( alloc >= endPrivateStorage )
          return wordStart-textToSearch; /* out of memory */

        /* Init the new struct and link it to the end of the occurence list. */
        SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, occur, 0,
                 private->posBytes )
        word->last->next = occur;
        word->last = occur;
      }
    }
    else
    {
      long i;

/* This is a new word.  Allocate a new Word struct, which contains an Occurrence 
    struct too.  */
      word = (Word *) alloc;
      alloc += ALLOC_SIZE( sizeof(Word) );
      if ( alloc >= endPrivateStorage )
        return wordStart-textToSearch ;  /* out of memory */

      /*  Link it to the start of the Word list, coming off the hash table. */
      word->next = private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ];
      private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ] = word;

      /* Init the Word struct */
      word->hash = hash;
      word->last = &word->first;

      /* Init the Occurrence struct */
      SET_POS( wordStart - textToSearch, &word->first, 0,
               private->posBytes )
    }
  }

  /* Finished parsing text */
  return -1;
}

FindWordOccurrence
long FindWordOccurrence (
  char *wordToFind,
  long wordLength,
  long occurrenceToFind,
  char *textToSearch,
  long textLength,
  void *privateStorage,
  long storageSize
)
{
  Private *private = privateStorage;
  Word  *word;
  ulong hash;

  /* Make occurenceToFind zero-based */
  occurrenceToFind--;

  /* Generate hash value for word to find */
  hash = 0;
  {
    long remain = wordLength;
    uchar *p = (uchar *) wordToFind;
    while ( remain > 0 )
    {
      hash = (hash << 1) ^ private->hashCodes[*p++];
      remain--;
    }
    hash = (hash & 0xFFFFFF) | (wordLength << 24);
  }

  /* Look for word/occurrence in hash table */
  word = LookupWord( private, textToSearch, wordToFind,
                     wordLength, hash );
  if ( word )
  {
    Occurrence *occur = &word->first;
    long blockSize, pos, i;

    /* Word exists in hash table, so go down the occurrence list.  */
    switch ( private->posBytes )
    {
      case POS_2_BYTES: blockSize = 6;  break;
      case POS_3_BYTES: blockSize = 4;  break;
      case POS_4_BYTES: blockSize = 3;  break;
    }

    while ( occur && occurrenceToFind >= blockSize )
    {
      occurrenceToFind -= blockSize;
      occur = occur->next;
    }

    if ( occur )
    {
      GET_POS( pos, occur, occurrenceToFind,
               private->posBytes )
      if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 || pos != 0 )
        return pos;
      occurrenceToFind -= blockSize;
    }

    occur = word->last;
    for ( i = 0; i < blockSize; i++ )
    {
      GET_POS( pos, occur, i, private->posBytes )
      if ( pos == 0 )
        occurrenceToFind++;
    }
  }

  /* Not in parsed text, so check the unparsed text */
  if ( private->endParsedText != -1 )
  {
    char *p;
    if ( wordLength > 3 )
      p = BMH_Search(
              private->hashCodes,
              wordToFind,
              wordLength,
              occurrenceToFind,
              textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
              textToSearch + textLength,
              private->nullChar );
    else
      p = SimpleSearch(
              private->hashCodes,
              wordToFind,
              wordLength,
              occurrenceToFind,
              textToSearch + private->endParsedText,
              textToSearch + textLength );
    if (p)
      return (p - textToSearch);
  }

  /* Not found */
  return -1;
}

LookupWord 
/* Look up a word in the hash table */
static Word *LookupWord (
  Private *private,
  char    *textToSearch,
  char    *wordText,
  long    wordLength,
  ulong   hash
)
{
  Word *word = private->hashTable[ hash & HASH_MASK ];
  while ( word )
  {
    if ( word->hash == hash )
    {
      char *w1, *w2;
      long pos, remain = wordLength;

      /*
        The hash values match, so compare characters to make sure it’s the right word.  
        We already know the word length is correct since the length is contained
        in the upper eight bits of the hash value.
      */
      GET_POS( pos, &word->first, 0, private->posBytes )
      w1 = textToSearch + pos;
      w2 = wordText;
      while ( remain-- > 0 && *w1++ == *w2++ )
        ;
      if ( remain == -1 )
        return word;
    }
    word = word->next;
  }
  return NULL;
}

PickNullChar 
/*
  Find a character that doesn’t appear anywhere in the unparsed text.  BMH_Search() is 
  faster if such a character can be found.
*/
static char PickNullChar (
  Private *private,
  uchar   *textStart,
  uchar   *textEnd
)
{
  long i;
  uchar *p, occurs[ ALPHABET_SIZE ];

  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    occurs[i] = FALSE;

  for ( p = textStart; p < textEnd; p++ )
    occurs[*p] = TRUE;

  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    if ( occurs[i] == FALSE && private->hashCodes[i] == 0 )
      return i;

  return NO_NULL_CHAR;
}

BMH_Search
/*
  Search the unparsed text using the Boyer-Moore-Horspool algorithm.  Ideally a null 
  character is supplied (one that appears in neither the search string nor the text being 
  searched).  This allows the inner loop to be faster.
*/
static char *BMH_Search (
  ulong *hashCodes,       /* private->hashCodes     */
  char  *wordToFind,
  long  wordLength,
  long  occurrenceToFind, /* 0 is first occurrence  */
  char  *textStart,       /* start of unparsed text */
  char  *textEnd,         /* end of unparsed text   */
  char  nullChar          /* private->nullChar      */
)
{
  long  i;
  char  *text, *wordEnd;
  char  word[256];
  long  offset[ ALPHABET_SIZE ];

  /*
    Copy the search string to a private buffer, where
    the first character is the null character.
  */
  word[0] = nullChar;
  for ( i = 0; i < wordLength; i++ )
    word[i+1] = wordToFind[i];

  /* Set up the offset[] lookup table */
  for ( i = 0; i < ALPHABET_SIZE; i++ )
    offset[i] = wordLength;

  for ( i = 1; i < wordLength; i++ )
    offset[ word[i] ] = wordLength - i;

  /* Let the search begin... */
  wordEnd = word + wordLength;
  text = textStart + wordLength - 1;

  if ( nullChar == NO_NULL_CHAR )
  {
    /* No null character, so use a slower inner loop */
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      long i;
      char *p, *q;
      for ( i = wordLength, p = wordEnd, q = text;
            i > 0 && *p == *q;
            i--, p--, q-- )
        ;
/*If i == 0, we have found the search string.  Now we make sure that it is delimited.*/
      if ( i == 0 && hashCodes[*q] == 0 &&
           (text+1 == textEnd || hashCodes[text[1]] == 0) )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return q+1;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }

      text += offset[*text];
    }
  }
  else
  {
    /* There is a null character (usual case), 
        so we can use a faster and simpler inner loop. */
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      char *p, *q;
      for ( p = wordEnd, q = text; *p == *q; p--, q-- )
        ;
      if ( p == word && hashCodes[*q] == 0 &&
           (text+1 == textEnd || hashCodes[text[1]] == 0) )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return q+1;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
      text += offset[*text];
    }
  }
  return NULL;
}

SimpleSearch
/*
  Search the unparsed text using a simple search algorithm.  Note that wordLength 
  must be 1, 2, or 3.  This algorithm runs faster than BMH_Search() for small search 
  strings.
*/
static char *SimpleSearch(
  ulong *hashCodes,       /* private->hashCodes      */
  char  *wordToFind,
  long  wordLength,       /* 1..3                    */
  long  occurrenceToFind, /* 0 is 1st occurrence     */
  char  *textStart,       /* start of unparsed text  */
  char  *textEnd          /* end of all text         */
)
{
  char *text, first;

  first = wordToFind[0];
  text = textStart;

  if ( wordLength == 1 )
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  else if ( wordLength == 2 )
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( text[1] == wordToFind[1] &&
           hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  else /* wordLength == 3 */
  {
    while ( text < textEnd )
    {
      while ( text < textEnd && *text != first )
        text++;
      if ( text[1] == wordToFind[1] &&
           text[2] == wordToFind[2] &&
           hashCodes[*(text-1)] == 0 &&
           hashCodes[text[wordLength]] == 0 )
      {
        if ( occurrenceToFind == 0 )
          return text;
        occurrenceToFind--;
      }
    text++;
    }
  }
  return NULL;
}

 

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Audition CC 2019 is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $20.99/month (or $9.99/month if you're a previous Audition customer). Adobe Audition CC 2019 empowers you to create and... Read more
Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2019 13.1.5 - Digi...
Premiere Pro CC 2019 is available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud for as little as $52.99/month. The price on display is a price for annual by-monthly plan for Adobe Premiere Pro only Adobe Premiere... Read more
Navicat Premium Essentials 12.1.25 - Pro...
Navicat Premium Essentials is a compact version of Navicat which provides basic and necessary features you will need to perform simple administration on a database. It supports the latest features... Read more
Sketch 58 - Design app for UX/UI for iOS...
Sketch is an innovative and fresh look at vector drawing. Its intentionally minimalist design is based upon a drawing space of unlimited size and layers, free of palettes, panels, menus, windows, and... Read more
ClipGrab 3.8.5 - Download videos from Yo...
ClipGrab is a free downloader and converter for YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook and many other online video sites. It converts downloaded videos to MPEG4, MP3 or other formats in just one easy step Version... Read more
Dash 4.6.6 - Instant search and offline...
Dash is an API documentation browser and code snippet manager. Dash helps you store snippets of code, as well as instantly search and browse documentation for almost any API you might use (for a full... Read more
FotoMagico 5.6.8 - Powerful slideshow cr...
FotoMagico lets you create professional slideshows from your photos and music with just a few, simple mouse clicks. It sports a very clean and intuitive yet powerful user interface. High image... Read more
Civilization VI 1.2.4 - Next iteration o...
Sid Meier’s Civilization VI is the next entry in the popular Civilization franchise. Originally created by legendary game designer Sid Meier, Civilization is a strategy game in which you attempt to... Read more
Skype 8.52.0.138 - Voice-over-internet p...
Skype allows you to talk to friends, family and co-workers across the Internet without the inconvenience of long distance telephone charges. Using peer-to-peer data transmission technology, Skype... Read more

Latest Forum Discussions

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Lots of premium games are going free (so...
You may have seen over the past couple weeks a that a bunch of premium games have suddenly become free. This isn’t a mistake, nor is it some last hurrah before Apple Arcade hits, and it’s important to know that these games aren’t actually becoming... | Read more »
Yoozoo Games launches Saint Seiya Awaken...
If you’re into your anime, you’ve probably seen or heard of Saint Seiya. Based on a shonen manga by Masami Kurumada, the series was massively popular in the 1980s – especially in its native Japan. Since then, it’s grown into a franchise of all... | Read more »
Five Nights at Freddy's AR: Special...
Five Nights at Freddy's AR: Special Delivery is a terrifying new nightmare from developer Illumix. Last week, FNAF fans were sent into a frenzy by a short teaser for what we now know to be Special Delivery. Those in the comments were quick to... | Read more »
Rush Rally 3's new live events are...
Last week, Rush Rally 3 got updated with live events, and it’s one of the best things to happen to racing games on mobile. Prior to this update, the game already had multiplayer, but live events are more convenient in the sense that it’s somewhat... | Read more »
Why your free-to-play racer sucks
It’s been this way for a while now, but playing Hot Wheels Infinite Loop really highlights a big issue with free-to-play mobile racing games: They suck. It doesn’t matter if you’re trying going for realism, cart racing, or arcade nonsense, they’re... | Read more »
Steam Link Spotlight - The Banner Saga 3
Steam Link Spotlight is a new feature where we take a look at PC games that play exceptionally well using the Steam Link app. Our last entry talked about Terry Cavanaugh’s incredible Dicey Dungeons. Read about how it’s a great mobile experience... | Read more »
Combo Quest (Games)
Combo Quest 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Combo Quest is an epic, time tap role-playing adventure. In this unique masterpiece, you are a knight on a heroic quest to retrieve... | Read more »
Hero Emblems (Games)
Hero Emblems 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $2.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: ** 25% OFF for a limited time to celebrate the release ** ** Note for iPhone 6 user: If it doesn't run fullscreen on your device... | Read more »
Puzzle Blitz (Games)
Puzzle Blitz 1.0 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0 (iTunes) Description: Puzzle Blitz is a frantic puzzle solving race against the clock! Solve as many puzzles as you can, before time runs out! You have... | Read more »
Sky Patrol (Games)
Sky Patrol 1.0.1 Device: iOS Universal Category: Games Price: $1.99, Version: 1.0.1 (iTunes) Description: 'Strategic Twist On The Classic Shooter Genre' - Indie Game Mag... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

$250 prepaid Visa card with any Apple iPhone,...
Xfinity Mobile will include a free $250 prepaid Visa card with the purchase of any new iPhone, new line activation, and transfer of phone number to Xfinity Mobile. Offer is valid through October 27,... Read more
Sprint is offering the 64GB Apple iPhone 11 P...
Sprint has the new 64GB iPhone 11 Pro available for $12.50 per month for new customers with an eligible trade-in in of iPhone 7 or newer. That’s down from their standard monthly lease of $41.67. The... Read more
Final week: Apple’s 2019 Back to School Promo...
Purchase a new Mac using Apple’s Education discount, and take up to $400 off MSRP. All teachers, students, and staff of any educational institution with a .edu email address qualify for the discount... Read more
Save $30 on Apple’s AirPods at these reseller...
Amazon is offering discounts on new 2019 Apple AirPods ranging up to $30 off MSRP as part of their Labor Day sale. Shipping is free: – AirPods with Charging Case: $144.95 $15 off MSRP – AirPods with... Read more
Preorder your Apple Watch Series 5 today at A...
Amazon has Apple Watch Series 5 GPS models available for preorder and on sale today for $15 off Apple’s MSRP. Shipping is free and starts on September 20th: – 40mm Apple Watch Series 5 GPS: $384.99 $... Read more
21″ iMacs on sale for $100 off Apple’s MSRP,...
B&H Photo has new 21″ Apple iMacs on sale for $100 off MSRP with models available starting at $999. These are the same iMacs offered by Apple in their retail and online stores. Overnight shipping... Read more
2018 4 and 6-Core Mac minis on sale today for...
Apple resellers are offering new 2018 4-Core and 6-Core Mac minis for $100-$150 off MSRP for a limited time. B&H Photo has the new 2018 4-Core and 6-Core Mac minis on sale for up to $150 off... Read more
Save $150-$250 on 10.2″ WiFi + Cellular iPads...
Verizon is offering $150-$250 discounts on Apple’s new 10.2″ WiFi + Cellular iPad with service. Buy the iPad itself and save $150. Save $250 on the purchase of an iPad along with an iPhone. The fine... Read more
Apple continues to offer 13″ 2.3GHz Dual-Core...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2017 13″ 2.3GHz Dual-Core non-Touch Bar MacBook Pros available starting at $1019. An standard Apple one-year warranty is included with each model, outer cases are new... Read more
Apple restocks 2018 MacBook Airs, Certified R...
Apple has restocked Certified Refurbished 2018 13″ MacBook Airs starting at only $849. Each MacBook features a new outer case, comes with a standard Apple one-year warranty, and is shipped free. The... Read more

Jobs Board

Student Employment (Blue *Apple* Cafe) Spri...
Student Employment (Blue Apple Cafe) Spring 2019 Penn State University Campus/Location: Penn State Brandywine Campus City: Media, PA Date Announced: 12/20/2018 Date Read more
Geek Squad *Apple* Master Consultation Agen...
**732907BR** **Job Title:** Geek Squad Apple Master Consultation Agent **Job Category:** Services/Installation/Repair **Location Number:** 000360-Williston-Store Read more
*Apple* Mobile Master - Best Buy (United Sta...
**728519BR** **Job Title:** Apple Mobile Master **Job Category:** Store Associates **Location Number:** 000853-Jackson-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Best Read more
*Apple* Mobility Pro - Best Buy (United Stat...
**733006BR** **Job Title:** Apple Mobility Pro **Job Category:** Store Associates **Location Number:** 000865-Conroe-Store **Job Description:** At Best Buy, our Read more
*Apple* Mobility Pro-Store 149 - Best Buy (U...
**731985BR** **Job Title:** Apple Mobility Pro-Store 149 **Job Category:** Store Associates **Location Number:** 000149-Towson-Store **Job Description:** At Best Read more
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