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Jun 95 Challenge
Volume Number:11
Issue Number:6
Column Tag:Programmer’s Challenge

Programmer’s Challenge

By Bob Boonstra and Mike Scanlin

Note: Source code files accompanying article are located on MacTech CD-ROM or source code disks.

Goodbye From Mike

This month is a special month. I have decided to turn the Programmer Challenge over to Bob Boonstra. Readers of this column will recognize Bob’s name from his many excellent winning solutions to the Challenges I’ve posed. In fact, Bob is the proud owner of six 1st-place showings. I can think of no-one I’d rather turn this column over to than Bob. I will judge the last two puzzles I have posed and Bob will judge the puzzles he poses (the first of which, Check Checkmate, is in this issue).

It’s been almost three years since I first started this column. While it has been incredibly rewarding to see so much optimal code and meet so many like-minded efficiency nuts, my life has changed during those three years and I no longer have the time that this column deserves. Even though I won't be writing it any more I'm sure this column will remain my favorite part of MacTech (I may even submit an entry once in a while...).

Thanks to everyone who took the time to write to me over the years with suggestions for Challenges. I have given Bob the compiled list of ideas. I’m sure he’d love to hear from you if you have any other ideas or comments on what you want to see in this column. I leave you in Bob’s capable hands...

Optimally yours,

Mike Scanlin
scanlin@genmagic.com

Check Checkmate

This month’s Challenge deals with the game of chess. You will be given a chess position and asked to produce the list of moves and captures that it is legal for one of the sides to make in accordance with the rules of chess. The objective is to produce the legal move list in minimum time.

Here are the prototypes for the routines you should write:

typedef enum {rowA=0,rowB,rowC,rowD,rowE,rowF,rowG,rowH} Row;
typedef enum {col1=0,col2,col3,col4,col5,col6,col7,col8} Col;
typedef enum {whiteSide=0,blackSide} Side;
typedef enum {king=0,queen,rook,bishop,knight,pawn} ChessPiece ;

typedef struct Square {
 Row row;
 Col col;
} Square;

typedef struct PiecePosition {
 Square sq;
 Side side;
 ChessPiece piece;
} PiecePosition;

typedef struct ChessMove {
 Square fromSq;
 Square toSq;
 Boolean moveIsCapture;
 Boolean opponentPlacedInCheck;
} ChessMove;

short /*numberOfMoves*/ LegalChessMoves(
 PiecePosition piecePositionArray[],
 short numberOfPieces,
 Side sideToMove,
 ChessMove legalMoveArray[],
 void *privateDataPtr
);

void InitChess(void *privateDataPtr);

This Challenge will consist of one call to InitChess, followed by multiple calls to LegalChessMoves. The InitChess routine will not be timed, and may initialize up to 32K bytes of storage preallocated by my testbench and pointed to by privateDataPtr. Your program should not use any static storage besides that pointed to by privateDataPtr.

Each call to LegalChessMoves will provide a piecePositionArray containing numberOfPieces chess pieces. Each piece is described in a PiecePosition struct containing the ChessPiece, Side, and position. The position is provided as a Square struct containing a Row and a Col, where rowA represents the starting row for the White major pieces, and rowH the starting row for Black. The columns are numbered from left to right as viewed from the White side, so that (rowH, col4) is the starting square of the Black queen in a new game. The piecePositionArray will describe a legal set of chess piece positions, anything from the initial positions in a new game to an end-game position. No position will be provided that could not be reached during a chess game. Remember that due to past pawn promotions, a side may have (for example) more than one queen. You should generate the moves for the side provided in sideToMove. The privateDataPtr parameter will be the same pointer provided to InitChess.

LegalChessMoves should store in legalMoveArray the complete list of legal ChessMoves for the sideToMove. The legalMoveArray will be allocated by my testbench and will be large enough to hold all of the legal moves for the given chess position. You should describe each legal move/capture by placing the row/col location of the moving piece in fromSq and the rol/col of the destination in toSq. In addition, for each move, the Boolean moveIsCapture should be set to true if the move captures an opponent's piece (and set to false otherwise). Similarly, the Boolean opponentPlacedInCheck should be set to true if the move places the opponent in check (and set to false otherwise). The return value of the function should be the number of moves stored in legalMoveArray. In generating the list of legal moves, you should assume that castling moves or en passant pawn captures cannot occur. Remember that it is not legal to make a chess move which places or leaves the moving side's king in check. If the sideToMove has been checkmated and cannot move, LegalChessMoves should return zero.

This month brings one change to the rules of the contest. From now on, with apologies (and sympathies) to any MacPlus users still out there, the 68020 code generation option will be turned ON. This Challenge will be scored using the THINK C compiler and 68K instruction set, but future Challenges will include occasional use of the CodeWarrior compiler and/or the PowerPC instruction set. This month, you should also include the following pragmas in your code:

#pragma options (mc68020, !mc68881, require_protos)
#pragma options (pack_enums, align_arrays)

Have fun, and e-mail me if there are any questions.

Two Months Ago Winner

I guess most people spent the beginning of April working on their taxes instead of the Stock Market Database Challenge because I only received 3 entries. Of those, only two worked correctly. Despite the lack of competition, I’m happy to say that the winning solution is quite good. Congratulations to Xan Gregg (Durham, NC) for his efficient solution. And thanks to Ernst Munter for taking the time to enter. Ernst was at a bit of a disadvantage, considering he had to develop his code on a DOS-based machine that didn’t have the RAM or disk space specified in the problem.

Here are the times and code sizes for both entries. Numbers in parens after a person’s name indicate that person’s cumulative point total for all previous Programmer Challenges, not including this one:

Name time code

Xan Gregg (4) 3523 1766

Ernst Munter (53) 61714 3470

The key to implementing a fast database where not everything fits into RAM is to have fast RAM-based indexes to your disk-based data and to minimize disk accesses. Also, for those times when you do read/write to the disk it’s really important to do it in even sector amounts. Xan uses 8K reads/writes. Sectors on most devices are 512 bytes each so 8K is a good choice. If your application ever needs to swap data to disk then you should study Xan’s code. It could save your users a lot of time.

Top 20 Contestants Of All Time

Here are the Top 20 Contestants for the 34 Programmer’s Challenges to date. The numbers below include points awarded for this months’ entrants. (Note: ties are listed alphabetically by last name - there are 24 people listed this month because 7 people have 20 points each.)

1. Boonstra, Bob 176

2. Karsh, Bill 71

3. Stenger, Allen 65

4. Munter, Ernst 63

5. Larsson, Gustav 60

6. Riha, Stepan 51

7. Goebel, James 49

8. Cutts, Kevin 46

9. Nepsund, Ronald 40

10. Vineyard, Jeremy 40

11. Darrah, Dave 34

12. Mallett, Jeff 34

13. Landry, Larry 29

14. Elwertowski, Tom 24

15. Gregg, Xan 24

16. Kasparian, Raffi 24

17. Lee, Johnny 22

18. Anderson, Troy 20

19. Burgoyne, Nick 20

20. Galway, Will 20

21. Israelson, Steve 20

22. Landweber, Greg 20

23. Noll, Bob 20

24. Pinkerton, Tom 20

There are three ways to earn points: (1) by scoring in the top 5 of any challenge, (2) by being the first person to find a bug in a published winning solution or, (3) being the first person to suggest a challenge that I use. The points you can win are:

1st place 20 points

2nd place 10 points

3rd place 7 points

4th place 4 points

5th place 2 points

finding bug 5 points

suggesting challenge 2 points

Here is Xan’s winning solution:

#include <OSUtils.h>
#include <Memory.h>
#include <Files.h>

/* OVERVIEW  market.c - by Xan Gregg
I cache all symbol names in memory and as many blocks
of trade data from disk as possible are cached in the rest
of the allowed memory.  For each symbol I keep a “pointer”
(block# and entry#) to the most recent trade involving that
symbol.  Each trade points to the previous trade of that
symbol.

The header includes an array of 26K entries in which each
entry points to a list of symbols.  All symbols with the
same first three letters are on the same list.  So the array
of symbol lists is indexed by the first three letters.

The trade data are stored on disk as a summary of the trade
information passed to NewTrade().  The time is stored in
a long, and the volume is stored as a daily cummulative
value.  The data is accumulated into a 8K block which
is written to disk when it gets full.

I know that there will be under 500,000 trades (since
the trade is at most 10MB and each Trade struct is 22
bytes).  And I have been told there will be about 10,000
symbols and at most 16K.  So that puts each symbol at
an average of 50 trades each.  That’s good for my approach
of indexing by the symbol name.  However, since I iterate
through the list of trades in reverse order, I am at a
disadvantage if a lot of older data is requested.

*/

typedef unsigned char uchar;
typedef unsigned short  ushort;
typedef unsigned long ulong;

typedef struct TimeStamp {
 uchar  yearsFrom1900;
 uchar  month;
 uchar  day;
 uchar  hour;
 uchar  minute;
 uchar  second;
} TimeStamp;

typedef char Str7[8];

typedef struct Trade {
 Str7   symbol;
 TimeStamptime;
 Fixed  price;
 ulong  numShares;
} Trade;

void *InitTradeDatabase(ulong maxRAM);
void NewTrade(void *privateDataPtr, Trade trade);
Fixed PriceIs(void *privateDataPtr, Str7 symbol, TimeStamp time);
ulong VolumeIs(void *privateDataPtr, Str7 symbol, TimeStamp time);

#define kBlockSize  8192L
#define kBlockEntries   (kBlockSize/16)
#define kFileSize   (8*1024L*1024L)
                /* enough to store 500,000 trades */
#define kNumBlocks  1024L

#define kNumSymbolIndices (26*32*32L)
#define kSecondsPerDay  (60L*60L*24)

typedef struct SymbolEntry SymbolEntry;

struct SymbolEntry
 {
    long        restOfSymbol;   /* last 4 chars */
    SymbolEntry *next;          /* with same 1st 3 chars */
    short       latestBlockNum; /* location on disk */
    short       latestEntryNum; /* location with block */
 };

/* 16-byte struct stored on disk for each trade */
typedef struct
 {
    ulong   seconds;      /* seconds since 1904 */
    Fixed   price;        /* same as from Trade record */
    ulong   totalShares;  /* current and previous */
    short   prevBlockNum;
    short   prevEntryNum;
 } TradeSummary;

typedef struct
 {
    TradeSummary data[kBlockEntries];
    short      blockNum;   /* where it is on disk */
    short   filler;
 } CachedBlock;

typedef struct
 {
    CachedBlock  *blockLocation[kNumBlocks]; /* 4KB */
    Ptr          symbolDataEnd;
    CachedBlock  *lowestBlockP;
    CachedBlock  *highestBlockP;
    CachedBlock  *oldestBlockP;
    CachedBlock  *currentOutBlockP;
    short        currentEntryNum;
    short        refNum;
    ParamBlockRec pb;
    ushort       symbolIndex[kNumSymbolIndices]; /* 26KB */
    SymbolEntry  symbols[1]; /* variable length */
 } Header;

/* the above struct takes less than 32K, and the
symbol data takes less than 192K (assuming a max of
16K symbols), so the cached blocks can use everything
after the first 224K */

#define gBlockLocation      dataP->blockLocation
#define gSymbolDataEnd      dataP->symbolDataEnd
#define gLowestBlockP       dataP->lowestBlockP
#define gHighestBlockP      dataP->highestBlockP
#define gOldestBlockP       dataP->oldestBlockP
#define gCurrentOutBlockP   dataP->currentOutBlockP
#define gCurrentEntryNum    dataP->currentEntryNum
#define gRefNum             dataP->refNum
#define gPB                 dataP->pb
#define gSymbolIndex        dataP->symbolIndex
#define gSymbols            dataP->symbols


void *InitTradeDatabase(ulong maxRAM)
{
    Header      *dataP;
    CachedBlock *blockP;

    maxRAM = maxRAM & -4L;  /* make sure end is aligned */
    dataP = (Header *) NewPtrClear(maxRAM);
    if (dataP == 0)
        DebugStr(“\p NO MEM”);

    /* skip the first symbol as 0 is not a valid index */
    gSymbolDataEnd = (Ptr) (gSymbols + 1);

    /* Initialize memory blocks at end of data area. */
    blockP = (CachedBlock *) (((Ptr) dataP) + maxRAM);
    gCurrentOutBlockP = blockP - 1;
    /* leaving 224K for headers and symbols */
    while ((Ptr) (blockP - 1) > ((Ptr) dataP) + 224*1024L)
     {
        blockP-;
        blockP->blockNum = -1;
     }
    gLowestBlockP = blockP;
    gHighestBlockP = gCurrentOutBlockP;
    gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP - 1;
    gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum = 0;
    gBlockLocation[0] = gCurrentOutBlockP;

    { /* create swap file */
    OSErr   err;
    long    size;
    err = Create(“\pXansSwapFile”, 0, ‘xxxx’, ‘DATA’);
    if (err)
     {
        FSDelete(“\pXansSwapFile”, 0);
        err = Create(“\pXansSwapFile”, 0, ‘xxxx’, ‘DATA’);
        if (err)
            DebugStr(“\p NO FILE”);
     }
    FSOpen(“\pXansSwapFile”, 0, &gRefNum);
    if (gRefNum == 0)
        DebugStr(“\p NO FILE”);
    size = kFileSize;
    err = AllocContig(gRefNum, &size);
    size = kFileSize;
    if (err)
        err = Allocate(gRefNum, &size);
    if (err)
        DebugStr(“\p NO FILE”);
    SetEOF(gRefNum, kFileSize);
    }
    return (void *) dataP;
}


/* Take a chance and use OS trap here.  If assembly
were allowed could at least cache the address of the
code and call it with a function pointer instead of
through a trap, or we could just write this whole
routine is assembly.
*/
ulong timeToSeconds(TimeStamp *timeP)
{
    DateTimeRec dateTime;
    ulong       seconds;

    dateTime.year = 1900 + timeP->yearsFrom1900;
    dateTime.month = timeP->month;
    dateTime.day = timeP->day;
    dateTime.hour = timeP->hour;
    dateTime.minute = timeP->minute;
    dateTime.second = timeP->second;
    Date2Secs(&dateTime, &seconds);
    return seconds;
}


/* returns 0 if the symbol was not found */
SymbolEntry *findSymbolEntry(Header *dataP, Str7 symbol)
{
    register long           rest;
    register SymbolEntry    *symbolP;
    long        memRest;
    short       keyIndex;
    char        secondChar;
    char        thirdChar;
    char        *p;
    short       len = symbol[0];

        /* figure the keyIndex (first three letters) */
    if (len < 2)
     {
        secondChar = 0;
        thirdChar = 0;
     }
    else
     {
        secondChar = symbol[2] - ‘@’;
        if (len != 2)
            thirdChar = symbol[3] - ‘@’;
        else
            thirdChar = 0;
     }
    keyIndex = ((symbol[1] - ‘A’) << 10)
                        | (secondChar << 5) | thirdChar;

    /* and the ‘rest’ (last four letters) */
    memRest = 0;
    p = (char *) &memRest;
    while (len > 3)
        *p++ = symbol[len-];

    rest = memRest;
    if (gSymbolIndex[keyIndex] == 0)
        symbolP = 0;
    else
     {
        symbolP = &gSymbols[gSymbolIndex[keyIndex]];
        while ((symbolP != 0)
                 && (symbolP->restOfSymbol != rest))
            symbolP = symbolP->next;
     }
    return symbolP;
}


/* like findSymbol, but inserts it if necessary */
SymbolEntry *findInsertSymbolEntry(Header *dataP,
                                        Str7 symbol)
{
    register long           rest;
    register SymbolEntry    *symbolP;
    long        memRest;
    short       keyIndex;
    char        secondChar;
    char        thirdChar;
    char        *p;
    short       len = symbol[0];

    /* figure the keyIndex (first three letters) */
    if (len < 2)
     {
        secondChar = 0;
        thirdChar = 0;
     }
    else
     {
        secondChar = symbol[2] - ‘@’;
        if (len != 2)
            thirdChar = symbol[3] - ‘@’;
        else
            thirdChar = 0;
     }
    keyIndex = ((symbol[1] - ‘A’) << 10)
                     | (secondChar << 5) | thirdChar;

    /* and the ‘rest’ (last four letters) */
    memRest = 0;
    p = (char *) &memRest;
    while (len > 3)
        *p++ = symbol[len-];

    rest = memRest;
    if (gSymbolIndex[keyIndex] == 0)
     {  /* this is the first symbol with this key */
        symbolP = (SymbolEntry *) gSymbolDataEnd;
        gSymbolIndex[keyIndex] =
                            (ushort) (symbolP - gSymbols);
        gSymbolDataEnd += sizeof(SymbolEntry);
        symbolP->restOfSymbol = rest;
        symbolP->next = 0;
        symbolP->latestBlockNum = -1;
     }
    else
     {  /* search the list for our last four letters */
        symbolP = &gSymbols[gSymbolIndex[keyIndex]];
        while ((symbolP->next != 0) &&
                    (symbolP->restOfSymbol != rest))
            symbolP = symbolP->next;
        if (symbolP->restOfSymbol != rest)
         {  /* not found so add it */
            symbolP->next = (SymbolEntry *) gSymbolDataEnd;
            symbolP = symbolP->next;
            gSymbolDataEnd += sizeof(SymbolEntry);
            symbolP->restOfSymbol = rest;
            symbolP->next = 0;
            symbolP->latestBlockNum = -1;
         }
     }
    return symbolP;
}

/* returns a pointer to a block in memory.  If the
block is not already in memory, it is loaded from disk. */
CachedBlock *getBlock(Header *dataP, short blockNum)
{
    CachedBlock     *blockP;
    ParamBlockRec   readPB;

    blockP = gBlockLocation[blockNum];
    if (blockP == 0)
     {  /* need to load it from disk */
        if (gOldestBlockP->blockNum >= 0)
            gBlockLocation[gOldestBlockP->blockNum] = 0;
        gOldestBlockP->blockNum = blockNum;
        readPB.ioParam.ioCompletion = 0;
        readPB.ioParam.ioRefNum = gRefNum;
        readPB.ioParam.ioBuffer = (Ptr) gOldestBlockP->data;
        readPB.ioParam.ioReqCount = kBlockSize;
        readPB.ioParam.ioPosMode = fsFromStart
                             | (1 << 5); /* don’t cache */
        readPB.ioParam.ioPosOffset = ((long) blockNum)
                                         * kBlockSize;
        PBRead(&readPB, true);
        gBlockLocation[blockNum] = gOldestBlockP;

        /* find the next oldest block */
        if (gOldestBlockP == gLowestBlockP)
            gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP;
        else
            gOldestBlockP-;
        if (gOldestBlockP == gCurrentOutBlockP)
            if (gOldestBlockP == gLowestBlockP)
                gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP;
            else
                gOldestBlockP-;
        if ((gPB.ioParam.ioResult > 0)
                && (((Ptr) gOldestBlockP->data)
                         == gPB.ioParam.ioBuffer))
            if (gOldestBlockP == gLowestBlockP)
                gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP;
            else
                gOldestBlockP-;
        if (gOldestBlockP == gCurrentOutBlockP)
            if (gOldestBlockP == gLowestBlockP)
                gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP;
            else
                gOldestBlockP-;
                     /* wait for read to complete */
        while (readPB.ioParam.ioResult > 0)
            ;
     }
    return blockP;
}


void writeCurrentBlock(Header *dataP)
{
    CachedBlock *p;

    /* make sure any previous write is done */
    while (gPB.ioParam.ioResult > 0)
        ;
    gPB.ioParam.ioRefNum = gRefNum;
    gPB.ioParam.ioBuffer = (Ptr) gCurrentOutBlockP->data;
    gPB.ioParam.ioReqCount = kBlockSize;
    gPB.ioParam.ioPosMode = fsFromStart;
    gPB.ioParam.ioPosOffset =
        ((long) gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum) * kBlockSize;
    PBWrite(&gPB, true);

    /* find the next oldest block */
    p = gOldestBlockP;
    if (gOldestBlockP == gLowestBlockP)
        gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP;
    else
        gOldestBlockP-;
    if (gOldestBlockP == gCurrentOutBlockP)
        if (gOldestBlockP == gLowestBlockP)
            gOldestBlockP = gHighestBlockP;
        else
            gOldestBlockP-;
    gCurrentOutBlockP = p;
}


void NewTrade(void *privateP, Trade trade)
{
    Header          *dataP = (Header *) privateP;
    ulong           seconds;
    TradeSummary    *tradeP;
    SymbolEntry     *symbolP;

    seconds = timeToSeconds(&trade.time);

    if (gCurrentEntryNum == kBlockEntries)
     {  /* current block is full, so write it out */
        short   curBlockNum = gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum;

        writeCurrentBlock(dataP);
        gCurrentEntryNum = 0;
        if (gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum >= 0)
            gBlockLocation[gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum] = 0;
        gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum = curBlockNum + 1;
        gBlockLocation[gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum] =
                                     gCurrentOutBlockP;
     }
    symbolP = findInsertSymbolEntry(dataP, trade.symbol);
    tradeP = &gCurrentOutBlockP->data[gCurrentEntryNum];
    tradeP->seconds = seconds;
    tradeP->price = trade.price;
    tradeP->totalShares = trade.numShares;
    if (symbolP->latestBlockNum >= 0)
     {
        CachedBlock *blockP;
        TradeSummary *prevTradeP;
        ulong       todaySeconds;

        todaySeconds = seconds - (seconds % kSecondsPerDay);
        blockP = getBlock(dataP, symbolP->latestBlockNum);
        prevTradeP = &blockP->data[symbolP->latestEntryNum];
        if (prevTradeP->seconds >= todaySeconds)
            tradeP->totalShares += prevTradeP->totalShares;
     }
    tradeP->prevBlockNum = symbolP->latestBlockNum;
    tradeP->prevEntryNum = symbolP->latestEntryNum;
    symbolP->latestBlockNum = gCurrentOutBlockP->blockNum;
    symbolP->latestEntryNum = gCurrentEntryNum;
    gCurrentEntryNum++;
}


Fixed PriceIs(void *privateP, Str7 symbol, TimeStamp time)
{
    Header      *dataP = (Header *) privateP;
    ulong       seconds;
    SymbolEntry *symbolP;

    seconds = timeToSeconds(&time);
    symbolP = findSymbolEntry(dataP, symbol);
    if (symbolP)
     {
        CachedBlock     *blockP;
        TradeSummary    *tradeP;

                    /* look for the most recent trade that is before
                         or on the requested time */
        blockP = getBlock(dataP, symbolP->latestBlockNum);
        tradeP = &blockP->data[symbolP->latestEntryNum];
        while (tradeP->seconds > seconds)
         {
            if (tradeP->prevBlockNum < 0)
                return 0;
            blockP = getBlock(dataP, tradeP->prevBlockNum);
            tradeP = &blockP->data[tradeP->prevEntryNum];
         }
        return tradeP->price;
     }
    else
        return 0;
}


ulong VolumeIs(void *privateP, Str7 symbol, TimeStamp time)
{
    Header      *dataP = (Header *) privateP;
    ulong       seconds;
    SymbolEntry *symbolP;
    ulong       todaySeconds;

    seconds = timeToSeconds(&time);
    todaySeconds = seconds - (seconds % kSecondsPerDay);
    symbolP = findSymbolEntry(dataP, symbol);
    if (symbolP)
     {
        CachedBlock     *blockP;
        TradeSummary    *tradeP;

                  /* look for the most recent trade that is before
             the requested time and on the same day */
        blockP = getBlock(dataP, symbolP->latestBlockNum);
        tradeP = &blockP->data[symbolP->latestEntryNum];
        while (tradeP->seconds >= seconds)
         {
            if (tradeP->prevBlockNum < 0)
                return 0;
            blockP = getBlock(dataP, tradeP->prevBlockNum);
            tradeP = &blockP->data[tradeP->prevEntryNum];
         }
        if (tradeP->seconds < todaySeconds)
            return 0;
        else
            return tradeP->totalShares;
     }
    else
        return 0;

}

 

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Imagine a tale of conlict between factions of good and evil, where rogueish heroes summon beasts to aid them in them in warfare and courageously battle dragons over fields of scorched earth and brimstone - that's exactly the essence of epic fantasy... | Read more »
Upcoming visual novel Arranged shines a...
If you’re in the market for a new type of visual novel designed to inform and make you think deeply about its subject matter, then Arranged by Kabuk Games could be exactly what you’re looking for. It’s a wholly unique take on marital traditions in... | Read more »
TEPPEN guide - The three best decks in T...
TEPPEN’s unique take on the collectible card game genre is exciting. It’s just over a week old, but that isn’t stopping lots of folks from speculating about the long-term viability of the game, as well as changes and additions that will happen over... | Read more »
Intergalactic puzzler Silly Memory serve...
Recently released matching puzzler Silly Memory is helping its fans with their intergalactic journeys this month with some very special offers on in-app purchases. In case you missed it, Silly Memory is the debut title of French based indie... | Read more »
TEPPEN guide - Tips and tricks for new p...
TEPPEN is a wild game that nobody asked for, but I’m sure glad it exists. Who would’ve thought that a CCG featuring Capcom characters could be so cool and weird? In case you’re not completely sure what TEPPEN is, make sure to check out our review... | Read more »
Dr. Mario World guide - Other games that...
We now live in a post-Dr. Mario World world, and I gotta say, things don’t feel too different. Nintendo continues to squirt out bad games on phones, causing all but the most stalwart fans of mobile games to question why they even bother... | Read more »
Strategy RPG Brown Dust introduces its b...
Epic turn-based RPG Brown Dust is set to turn 500 days old next week, and to celebrate, Neowiz has just unveiled its biggest and most exciting update yet, offering a host of new rewards, increased gacha rates, and a brand new feature that will... | Read more »
Dr. Mario World is yet another disappoin...
As soon as I booted up Dr. Mario World, I knew I wasn’t going to have fun with it. Nintendo’s record on phones thus far has been pretty spotty, with things trending downward as of late. [Read more] | Read more »
Retro Space Shooter P.3 is now available...
Shoot-em-ups tend to be a dime a dozen on the App Store, but every so often you come across one gem that aims to shake up the genre in a unique way. Developer Devjgame’s P.3 is the latest game seeking to do so this, working as a love letter to the... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Weekend Deal: 2018 13″ MacBook Airs starting...
B&H Photo has clearance 2018 13″ MacBook Airs available starting at only $999 with all models now available for $200 off Apple’s original MSRP. Overnight shipping, or expedited shipping, is free... Read more
Apple has clearance 10.5″ iPad Pros available...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2017 10.5″ iPad Pros available starting at $469. An Apple one-year warranty is included with each iPad, outer shells are new, and shipping is free: – 64GB 10″ iPad Pro... Read more
Apple restocks refurbished iPad mini 4 models...
Apple has restocked Certified Refurbished 32GB iPad mini 4 WiFi models for $229 shipped. That’s $70 off original MSRP for the iPad mini 4. Space Gray, Silver, and Gold colors are available. Read more
Apple, Yet Again, Is Missing An Ultraportable...
EDITORIAL: 07.19.19 Prior to the decision made by Apple earlier this month to retire the thin and light MacBook model with a 12-inch retina display, the Cupertino, California-based company offered,... Read more
Verizon is offering a 50% discount on iPhone...
Verizon is offering 50% discounts on Apple iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus models though July 24th, plus save 50% on activation fees. New line required. The fine print: “New device payment & new... Read more
Get a new 21″ iMac for under $1000 today at t...
B&H Photo has new 21″ Apple iMacs on sale for up to $100 off MSRP with models available starting at $999. These are the same iMacs offered by Apple in their retail and online stores. Shipping is... Read more
Clearance 2017 15″ 2.8GHz Touch Bar MacBook P...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2017 15″ 2.8GHz Space Gray Touch Bar MacBook Pros available for $1809. Apple’s refurbished price is currently the lowest available for a 15″ MacBook Pro. An standard... Read more
Clearance 12″ 1.2GHz MacBook on sale for $899...
Focus Camera has clearance 12″ 1.2GHz Space Gray MacBooks available for $899.99 shipped. That’s $400 off Apple’s original MSRP. Focus charges sales tax for NY & NJ residents only. Read more
Get a new 2019 13″ 2.4GHz 4-Core MacBook Pro...
B&H Photo has new 2019 13″ 2.4GHz MacBook Pros on sale for up to $150 off Apple’s MSRP. Overnight shipping is free to many addresses in the US: – 2019 13″ 2.4GHz/256GB 6-Core MacBook Pro Silver... Read more
AirPods with Wireless Charging Case now on sa...
Amazon has extended their Prime Day savings on Apple AirPods by offering AirPods with the Wireless Charging case for $169.99. That’s $30 off Apple’s MSRP, and it’s the cheapest price available for... Read more

Jobs Board

Geek Squad *Apple* Master Consultation Agen...
**702908BR** **Job Title:** Geek Squad Apple Master Consultation Agent **Job Category:** Services/Installation/Repair **Location Number:** 000360-Williston-Store Read more
Best Buy *Apple* Computing Master - Best Bu...
**711023BR** **Job Title:** Best Buy Apple Computing Master **Job Category:** Sales **Location Number:** 000012-St Cloud-Store **Job Description:** **What does a Read more
*Apple* Systems Architect/Engineer, Vice Pre...
…its vision to be the world's most trusted financial group. **Summary:** Apple Systems Architect/Engineer with strong knowledge of products and services related to Read more
Best Buy *Apple* Computing Master - Best Bu...
**696259BR** **Job Title:** Best Buy Apple Computing Master **Job Category:** Store Associates **Location Number:** 001076-Temecula-Store **Job Description:** The Read more
Business Development Manager, *Apple* Globa...
Business Development Manager, Apple Global Tampa, FL, US Requisition Number:73805 As a Global Apple Business Development Manager at Insight, you proactively Read more
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