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Christmas Graphics
Volume Number:1
Issue Number:13
Column Tag:Pascal Procedures

Christmas Graphics

By Alan Wootton, President, Top-Notch Productions, MacTutor Contributing Editor

Last month I promised to complete my discussion on desk accessories. I still plan to do that, but this month is Christmas so we will take it easy and do some more lighthearted things. We will take an overview of the types of programming one might do on the Macintosh. I have two short programs demonstrating how to write code in resources, and a short program that draws a Christmas tree.

Resources as code

Unless you are writing code for a dedicated appliance controller, or something similar, the programs you write will be started by another program, usually the operating system. Your program, when finished, will return control to that 'other' program. In the case of a Macintosh Application, the program is started by another Application (usually the Finder) using the Toolbox procedure Launch (see Segment Loader chapter of Inside Mac). When the program is finished it returns to the Finder by calling ExitToShell (or Launch!), or by just reaching the end of the main procedure, in which case ExitToShell is called for you. If you have been following this column you will know that there are other kinds of programs besides just Applications. Desk Accessories are called repeatedly by the toolbox when the resident Application calls SystemTask. In addition to these two there are many other ways to get your piece of code executed.

One of the features of native code compilers (for the 68000) is that the code they produce is position independent. This means that it does not matter what address the program occupies -- it always runs properly. So, potentially any portion of memory could be loaded with code and run. In the case of an application, the Segment Loader handles this chore. In the case of DAs, the Device Manager loads resources of type DRVR and passes control to the code within. The Window Manager, the Menu Manager, the Control Manager, and others will load and run pieces of code. There is no reason why we cannot do it, too.

The compilers normal output (actually produced by the linker) is a single piece of code that is stored in the resource CODE #1. The structure of this code is illustrated in figure 1.

Note that the code is produced in the same order as the procedures occur. A jump is used to transfer control to the main procedure. Further, note that the main procedure does not begin and end like the others. It does not return control to the caller at all. Rather, it exits to the finder. The link and unlink are used to reserve space on the stack for the vars declared for that procedure.

An important thing to notice is the existence of phantom procedures past the end of the program. These are known as library routines and have the purpose of providing functions that are needed by the program. String functions and Operating System traps are examples. You can even make your own library procedures and, by declaring them, cause the linker to include that code.

There is a problem with the MDS linker. It is not as efficient as it should be. When you refer to a .rel file in a link directive file (link directive files are produced automatically by TML Pascal, although you may make your own), the whole .rel file is linked onto the end of your code, whether it is used or not. If you need more control you can make your own library files that only have those routines actually needed in them (requiring much work in assembly language). Another way is the get the Optimizing Linker and Librarian from Consulair Corp. (Portola Valley, CA). Consulair normally sells a C compiler but, since that compiler is MDS compatible, you may use their products in conjunction with the TML Pascal Compiler. TML may be able to sell you that linker also.

There is another oddity about the main procedure that is not shown in the diagram. All variables declared in the main procedure are accessed in a special way. These variables are not created temporarily like in the other procedures. The variables for the main procedure are created by the segment loader above the beginning of the stack and the register A5 is reserved for the sole purpose of accessing those variables. This means that, except for application code, procedures in resources absolutely must not access any global variables. This was mentioned in regard to DAs last month and is applicable here, too.

Before we lose our way in all this technical mush, let us remember that our goal is to use a resource as a procedure. In order to do this we have one final hurdle to overcome.

The most general method will be to use the beginning of the resource as the beginnning of the program. A glance at figure 1 shows that this does not work on the program in its CODE 1 form. Since we will have to use the Rmaker to convert from type CODE to another type, (here we use PROC) we could use Rmaker to convert from the program form to the procedure form. Rmaker does not make this an easy task. There is a Rmaker type that will trim off the first two words (created by the segment loader) of the CODE 1 resource (refer to your Rmaker documentation). Unfortunately, we need to also avoid the jump to the main procedure. If we tell the compiler to put our procedure into a CODE 2 resource then there is no jump, but Rmaker will not trim any other than CODE 1. After much thought I came upon what seems to be the best solution. Use the GNRL type directive to place the word $6008 at the front of the destination resource and then copy the CODE 1 resource after that. $6008 is the 68000 code to branch over the next 8 bytes. This effectively skips the two segment loader bytes and the jump. For CODE types other than number 1 there will not be a jump, so use $6004 to skip only the first two words. See the Rmaker input file below for an example.

Prompt_For_String

The procedure I present to illustrate the use of procedures in resources is a compiled version of the Dialog box example presented here in July (Vol.1 No. 8). Its purpose is to open a dialog box, request a string from the user, and then go away, returning the string to the calling program. To compile this first compile Pr_for_Str.pas, link Pr_for_Str.link (this file is created by the compiler), and then use Rmaker with Pr_for_String.R. The resulting file is Pr_for_Str.PROC which contains the resources PROC 567, which is our procedure, and also the DLOG and DITL for the dialog box.

The most interesting part of the example is the third part, the program Pr_for_Str.Mpas. This is a short (except for the declarations) MacPascal program that shows how you could use an external and compiled procedure from within MacPascal.

Inline again

All the action in Pr_for_Str.Mpas (below) takes place in the main procedure. For readability of those eleven lines I have declared the Toolbox routines as procedures, rather than just using inlines in the code. This is the simplest use of inline, once you get the definitions correct it is difficult to call the Toolbox traps incorrectly. Following the example below it is easy to type in Toolbox routines using Inside Mac as a guide.

The exceptions are register based traps. For these I use Generic (see Advanced Mac'ing in MacTutor Vol.1 No. 5). When Inside Mac says (using Hlock as an example):

PROCEDURE Hlock(h:handle);
  On entry       A0: h (handle)
    On exit            D0: result code (integer)

You set regs.a[0] to the handle and call Generic with $A029 (look up the trap number in a cross reference). The record regs is read by Generic and the trap is called. Note that later you can check loword(regs.d[0]) for an error.

This is not the end of the the ugliness. In order to call an external procedure it is necessary to abuse inline. Instead of a trap number we use the word $4E75 which will transfer execution to the address corresponding to the last argument to inline. The last argument is @jsr[0] which is the address of an array of 4 words which has been set to a short routine to shuffle some registers and then call the address that is next to last in the arguments. In this case it is the address of the resource PROC 567. For more info on jsr see my column in MacTutor Vol.1 No.9. The printing example uses jsr and the 68000 code is given.

Once you become comfortable with the inline kludges required, you can make arbitrarily complex MacPascal programs. Simply work on your program until it becomes too large (or too slow), then compile those procedures that are in a relatively finished state. When the compiled procs are replaced by the code to call them externally your program will then be much shorter, and you can add to it until it is time to repeat the cycle. Eventually, all that is left is a core with the bulk of the program compiled. At that point you move the last of the program to the compiler and you have a completed program!

Skip over the Pr_for_Str stuff (3 files) now and we will do something much more fun.

TML Pascal code
Program Pr_For_Str;{ file Pr_For_Str.pas }
{ by Alan Wootton 10/85 }
{ written for TML Pascal }

{ $I means include these interface files }
(*$I MemTypes.ipas  *)
(*$I QuickDraw.ipas *)
(*$I OSIntf.ipas    *)
(*$I ToolIntf.ipas  *)

{ We will convert this code with Rmaker in
  such a way as to cause execution to begin
  with the FIRST PROCEDURE, and not in the
  main procedure.    }

{ This procedure expects the resource
  DLOG 12345 to be available.  It opens a
  dialog box and returns a string in result.
  If no string is input by the user then
  the string '' is returned.      }
 
{ Execution begins here } 
Procedure Prompt_for_Str(var Prompt:str255;
                  var Sample:str255;
                   var Result:str255);
  const
       OKbutton      =1;{ items in DLOG box }
       CANCELbutton  =2;
       RESULTtext    =3;
       PROMPTtext    =4;
  var
       DlogPtr : DialogPtr;
       TempHand: handle;
       itype, itemHit : integer;
       R : rect;
       itemH : Handle;
begin
     TempHand:=GetResource('DLOG',12345);
      if TempHand<>nil then
          begin
               DlogPtr:=GetNewDialog(12345,nil,pointer(-1));
    
               GetDItem(DlogPtr,PROMPTtext,itype,itemH,R);
                if length(Prompt)<>0 then
           SetItext( itemH, Prompt);
    
               GetDItem(DlogPtr,RESULTtext,itype,itemH,R);
                if length(Sample)<>0 then
           SetItext( itemH, Sample);
               { Note that itemH is now handle to result }
               { text item and will be used later. }
    
               ModalDialog( nil, itemHit);
    
               if itemHit=CANCELbutton then
           result := ''
                else
           GetIText( itemH, result);
  
               DisposDialog( DlogPtr);
          end;
   end;{ of procedure }

begin{ main }
   { ¡¡¡¡ main not used !!!! }
end.

                  Rmaker code
;;                                     
;;  file Pr_For_Str.R
;; 
;;  Feeding this to Rmaker is the last
;;  step when compiling Pr_For_Str
;; 
;;  The CODE 1 resource is read from 
;;  Pr_For_Str, the link output, and 
;;  is written to the resource PROC 567
;;  in Pr_For_Str.PROC
;;  
;;  A branch is added to the front of
;;  the code to skip the segment header 
;;  (4 bytes), and in this case, to also
;;  skip the instruction to jump to the 
;;  main procedure (4 bytes, for 8 total).
;;  Use 6004 for bra.s *+4.
;;                                     
Pr_For_Str.PROC;;;  destination file name 
????????;;  type and creator 
;;                                     

type PROC = GNRL
Prompt_For_Str,567
.H 
6008;;  bra.s *+8 
.R
Pr_For_Str CODE 1

;;****************************************
;;**  Definition of a Dialog Manager    **
;;**  window.                           **
;;****************************************
;;  global coordinates !!

type DLOG
box,12345
;;notitle
96 128 148 384 ;; top left bottom right 
visible goaway
1              ;; window type = dBoxProc 
0              ;; refcon
12345          ;; ID of DITL associated
               ;; with this DLOG

;;****************************************
;;**  Next is a list of 'items' to go   **
;;**  in the window.                    **
;;****************************************

type DITL       ;; see Dialog Manager
items,12345
4               ;; four items 

Button
4 120 24 180    ;;  local coordinates !!
OK;;

Button
4 188 24 248
Cancel;;

EditText Disabled  
32 8 48 248        
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;text added later 

StaticText Disabled  
4 8 20 120           
Type a String;; prompt, modified later

;;                                     
;;  end of file Pr_For_Str.R
;;                                     

               MacPascal code

program Pr_For_Str_Test;{ by Alan Wootton 10/85 }
{ This program exercises an external procedure }
{ that presents a dialog box requesting the user }
{ to input a string. }
 type
     ptr = ^char;
     handle = ^ptr;
     ResType = longint;
 var
     ResRefNum : integer;{ resource file ref num }
     str : str255;
     regs : record { for generic }
          A : array[0..4] of longint;
          D : array[0..7] of longint;
      end;

{--------------------------------------------------------------------}
{--Toolbox interface routines we will be using----------}
{--------------------------------------------------------------------}
 function OpenResFile (filename : str255) : integer;
 begin
     OpenResFile := WinlineF($A997, @filename);
 end;
 procedure CloseResFile (refNum : integer);
 begin
     inlineP($A99A, refnum);
 end;
 function HomeResFile (TheResource : Handle) : integer;
 begin
     HomeResFile := WinlineF($A9A4, TheResource);
 end;
 function GetResource (TheType : ResType; TheID : integer) : Handle;
 begin
     GetResource := pointer(LinlineF($A9A0, TheType, TheID));
 end;
 procedure DetachResource (TheResource : Handle);
 begin
     inlineP($A992, TheResource);
 end;
{ The Hlock that is predefined does not work!!! }
 procedure Hlock (H : Handle);
 begin
     regs.a[0] := ord(h);
     Generic($A029, regs);
 end;
{ convert a Str255 to ResType }
 function StrToType (str : str255) : ResType;
  var
      TheType : ResType;
 begin
     BlockMove(@str[1], @TheType, 4);
     StrToType := TheType;
 end;
{--end of interface routines-------------------------------}
{------------------------------------------------------------------}

{------------------------------------------------------------------}
{--Routine to call  PROC 567 resource  ----------------}
{------------------------------------------------------------------}
 procedure Prompt_for_String (Pr : str255;
                                                                Sa : 
str255;
                                                       var Re : str255);
  var
      Hand : handle;
      jsr : array[0..3] of integer;
 begin
     stuffHex(@jsr, '5488225F2F084ED1');
       { code to jsr to top of stack }
     Hand := GetResource( StrToType ('PROC'), 567);
     if Hand <> nil then
         begin
             Hlock(Hand);
             inlineP($4E75, @Pr, @Sa, @Re, Hand^, @jsr);
{            $4E75 is rts to code in @jsr which calls Hand^ }
{            normally you might unlock Hand now }
         end
        else
            writeln('PROC 567 not found');
    end;

begin     {   main, test prompt for string }
    ResRefNum := OpenResFile('Pr_For_Str.PROC');
    if ResRefNum > 0 then
        begin
            Prompt_For_String('Str Please', 'example str', str);
            writeln('The str returned is ', str);
            CloseResFile(ResRefNum)
        end
    else
        writeln('OpenResFile failed');
end.

Christmas graphics

For those who like short MacPascal programs that make intricate drawings I present the program X_Tree (below) that makes the picture-of-many-needles (above). The way this works is that it loops, while drawing branches (needles) proportional to the remaining length, until the remaining length is short. To draw the branches the same routine is called again (an example of recursion), so that the branches look like smaller versions of the whole tree. This would be a simple program except that in order to project a line of a particular length (Length), in a particular direction (Direction) one must use the trigonometric functions Sin and Cos. These functions, when multiplied by a length, give the horizontal (Cos) and vertical (Sin) component of a line in the given direction. It wouldn't be so bad, but the direction given to Sin and Cos is not in degrees! It is in radians. Radians are a mathematical unit for angles used by SANE and scientists everywhere. To use radians note that 180° is the same as Π radians (see how the variable pi is set to the value of Π below). This means that 60° (or 180°/3) is the same as pi/3.

To make the drawing above I pasted the DrawSomething procedure into the program Pict_to_Clip (October MacTutor, Vol.1 No.11) and ran it. I then quit MacPascal and started MacDraw and did a paste. After that I added the text next to it and cut everything onto the clipboard. I then pasted the result into MacWrite for this article. [The Pict_to_Clip utility referred to above is a marvelous little program that writes a user defined function to a pict resource and moves the pict resource into the clipboard where it can be pasted into other applications that support laser printing, like Mac Draw. In this way, it makes the Macintosh into a plotter! Available on our source code disks or as a back issue (October 1985) through the MacTutor mail order store. -Ed.]

program X_Tree;
   uses
       SANE;

 procedure DrawSomething;
     const
           NeedleMin = 5;{ cutoff size for Needles }
     var
          pi, Direction, X, Y : extended;

{ The variables above are global to the proc "Tree". }
{ X, and Y, are the pen position in floating point form. }
{ Direction is an angle pointing in the direction the }
{ "tree" is. Direction is in radians, ie. -pi/2 is up, }
{  pi/2 is down, 0 is to the right, pi is to the left. }

  procedure Tree (Length : extended);
{ Given a length and a direction, this proc will }
{ draw a line of the given length and, size permitting, }
{ will draw a series of "subtrees", or "needles", of }
{ decreasing size alongside the "tree" line. }
    var
        OldDir, Needle, PrevX, PrevY : extended;
  begin
      PrevX := X;
      PrevY := Y;{ Save direction and position. }
      OldDir := Direction;
      Needle := Length / 3;{ Length of first "needle". }

      while Length > 1 do
          begin { Subdivide "tree" }

              if Needle > NeedleMin then
                  begin { Draw left, then right, needle. }
                      Direction := OldDir - pi / 3;{ 60 degrees }
                      Tree(Needle);
                      Direction := OldDir + pi / 3;
                     Tree(Needle);
                  end
              else { else make line remaining length }
                  Needle := Length * 3;

              { Draw portion of tree between successive needles }
              Direction := OldDir;
              MoveTo(num2integer(X), num2integer(Y));
              X := X + (Cos(Direction) * Needle / 3);
              Y := Y + (Sin(Direction) * Needle / 3);
              LineTo(num2integer(X), num2integer(Y));

              Length := Length - Needle / 3;{ shorten length }
              Needle := Needle * (1 - 1 / 9);{ shorten needle }
          end;

         X := PrevX;
         Y := PrevY;{ restore position and direction }
         Direction := OldDir;
     end;

 begin { procedure DrawSomething }
     pi := arctan(1) * 4;{ 3.14159... }
     Direction := -pi / 2;{ -90 degrees = up }
     X := 200;
     Y := 240;{ tree base at 200,240 }
     Tree(200);{ 200 = size of tree }
 end;


begin { main program }
    ShowDrawing;
    DrawSomething;
end.

More Resources as code

A more technical example of writing code for resources is now presented for advanced programmers. The VBLExample (below) is an INIT resource that installs a Vertical Retrace routine at system startup.

Vertical Retrace routines are short pieces of code that are executed periodically by the system. They are not for general use, however, since they are executed during an interrupt. This means that you cannot use any Toolbox traps that use the memory manager. This includes Quickdraw. Bob Denny (C Workshop, MacTutor Vol.1 No.9) gives a good description of the Vertical Retrace Manager so I won't do it here. All the example does is increment the first longint in the screen buffer. This makes a tiny binary counter in the upper left of the screen.

To put a task into the Vertical Retrace queue you must fill out a short record and pass it to Vinstall. Notice that I break all the rules and put this record in the same resource with the code! The procedure dummy is declared to make some unused space and GetGlobalData is called to get a pointer to our permanent storage record (remember, only the application can have permanent global variables).

Inlines again! The TML Pascal compiler has a type of inline that you can use (carefully). It is not the same as the MacPascal inlines. The syntax is a procedure declaration, followed immediately by "inline", and then by an integer. When the procedure is called the word is excuted in the place of the normal jsr. In the program VBLExample I create a procedure that will set register A0 and another that will invoke the trap _Vinstall. By using these two it is possible to alleviate the need for any libraries at all (no other Toolbox calls or procedures require library support in the example).

Bob Denny also gives a good description of how INIT resources work, so I won't repeat it. Debugging is another story. The code in INIT resources is called during startup and at that time it is just about impossible to use a debugger! This can make INIT resources very hard to trace. To make it easy I wrote the MacPascal program Run_INIT (below). This program does to an INIT resource the same thing the system does at startup. It is also a good description of how the system treats INIT resouces. Note that since no parameters are passed you can use Generic to call the external procedure instead of @jsr like it did in Pr_for_Str.Mpas. Otherwise these two have much in common.

We have seen the operation of two types of code resources, INIT and PROC. These are merely the tip of the iceberg. Perhaps later we'll try MDEF, WDEF, or CDEF (menu, window, and control definintion functions) in addition to our normal projects involving CODE and DRVR (for applications and desks accessories).

Until next month, may the bugs bite you only in obvious places, and Merry Christmas!

program VBLExample;{ file VBLExample.pas }
{  by Alan Wootton 10/85 }
{ written in TML Pascal }

{  $I=Include these interface files }
(*$I MemTypes.ipas  *)
(*$I QuickDraw.ipas *)
(*$I OSIntf.ipas    *)
(*$I ToolIntf.ipas  *)

{ We will convert this code with Rmaker in
  such a way as to cause execution to begin
  with the FIRST PROCEDURE, and not in the
  main procedure.    }

TYPE

  GlobalDataP=^GlobalData;
  GlobalData=record
  vblPart:VBLTask;
  count:longint;
       end;{ 18 bytes long }
    
{ var
     no global variables allowed }
     
{ the following four procs don't generate code now }
Procedure SetA0(a0:longint);inline $205F;{ MOVE.l (SP)+,A0 }
Procedure Vinstall_Trap;inline $A033;{ _Vinstall trap }
Function GetGlobalData : GlobalDataP;FORWARD;
Procedure VBLScreenTask;FORWARD;

{ execution begins here }
{ We install VBLScreenTask in the VBL queue and 
   set up the body of the dummy procedure as our
   data record. }

Procedure InstallVBLTask;{ one time setup routine }
var
     cp : GlobalDataP;
begin
  cp := GetGlobalData;
  cp^.count:=0;
  with cp^.VBLPart do
    begin
        qType:=ord(vType);
 vblAddr:=@VBLScreenTask;
 vblCount:=1;
 vblPhase:=0;
 { This funky double step is my way of calling Vinstall 
    without having to link with another file.  Register A0
    is set and then the trap is called. }
 SetA0(ord(@cp^.VBLPart));
 Vinstall_Trap;
    end;
end;

Procedure Dummy;{ reserve some bytes in the code space }
begin
    Dummy; Dummy; Dummy; Dummy;{ 8 bytes }
    Dummy; Dummy; Dummy; Dummy;{ 8 bytes }
    Dummy;
end;

Function GetGlobalData {: GlobalDataP};
begin
    GetGlobalData := pointer(ord(@Dummy));
end;

{ Reset the VBLCount so we remain in queue and
  utilise $824 (SCRNBASE global) to find address
  of the screen and write the count there.        }

Procedure VBLScreenTask;
   var
       cp : GlobalDataP;
       ScreenP:^longint;
begin
  ScreenP:=pointer($824);
  ScreenP:=pointer(ScreenP^);
  cp:=GetGlobalData;
  with cp^ do 
      begin
         count:=count+1;
  with VBLpart do
      begin
        VBLCount:=1;
        ScreenP^:=count;
      end;
       end;
 end;{ vbltask }
  
begin{ main }
    { ¡¡¡ main procedure not used !!! }
end.


;;----------------------------------------------------
;;  file VBLExample.R
;; 
;;  Feeding this to Rmaker is the last
;;  step when compiling VBLExample.
;; 
;;  The CODE 1 resource is read from 
;;  VBLExample, the link output, and 
;;  is written to the resource INIT 16 
;;  in VBLExample.INIT
;; 
;;  A branch is added to the front of
;;  the code to skip the segment header 
;;  (4 bytes), and in this case, to also
;;  skip the instruction to jump to the 
;;  main procedure (4 bytes, for 8 total).
;;  Use 6004 for bra.s *+4.
;;----------------------------------------------------
VBLExample.INIT;;;  destination file name 
????????;;  type and creator 
;;----------------------------------------------------

type INIT = GNRL
VBLExample,16 (80)
.H 
6008;;  bra.s *+8 
.R
VBLExample CODE 1

;;----------------------------------------------------
;;  end of file VBLExample.R
;;----------------------------------------------------

program Run_INIT;{  by Alan Wootton 10/85 }
{ This MacPascal program is for testing }
{ INIT resources.  It loads the INIT }
{ resource number 16 from the file named below, }
{ and runs it just as the boot code would at system }
{ startup.  The handle is writeln'd and you are given }
{ the opportunity to invoke a debugger, and set }
{ breakpoints, if desired. }
 type
     ptr = ^char;
     handle = ^ptr;
     ResType = longint;
 var
     ResRefNum : integer;{ resource file ref num }
     str : str255;
     hand : handle;{ handle to code }
     longP : ^longint; 
    regs : record { for generic }
          A : array[0..4] of longint;
          D : array[0..7] of longint;
      end;

{--------------------------------------------------------------------}
{--Toolbox interface routines we will be using----------}
{ copy routines from Pr_For_Str_test (above) }

{------------------------------------------------------------------}
{--Routine to call a 68000 proc in memory-------------}
{--note that the handle is not locked,-------------------}
{--and no parameters are passed------------------------}
 procedure RunHandle (Hand : handle);
 begin
     regs.A[0] := ord(hand^);{ set A0 }
     Generic($4E90, regs);{ $4E90 = JSR (A0) }
 end;


begin              {  main,  program starts here }
    ShowText;
    ResRefNum := OpenResFile('VBLExample.INIT');
    if ResRefNum > 0 then
        begin
            hand := GetResource(StrToType('INIT'), 16);
            if hand <> nil then
                begin
                    if HomeResfile(hand) = ResRefNum then
                        begin  
                            writeln('handle is ', ord(hand));
                            writeln('run resource ? (y/n)');
                            readln(str);
                            if str = 'y' then
                                begin
                                    DetachResource(hand);
                                    RunHandle(hand);
                                    longP := hand^;
                                    longP^ := $4E714E71;{ nop nop }
                                end;
                           end
                       else
                           writeln(' resource from wrong file');
                   end
                  else
                      writeln(' resource not loaded ');
              CloseResFile(ResRefNum);
        end
    else
        writeln('OpenResFile failed');
end.


 

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Compressor adds power and flexibility to Final Cut Pro X export. Customize output settings, work faster with distributed encoding, and tap into a comprehensive set of delivery features. Features:... Read more
Motion 5.5.1 - Create and customize Fina...
Motion is designed for video editors, Motion 5 lets you customize Final Cut Pro titles, transitions, and effects. Or create your own dazzling animations in 2D or 3D space, with real-time feedback as... Read more

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Frogger in Toy Town's latest update...
Konami Digital Entertainment has announced today that their Apple Arcade title Frogger in Toy Town has been updated to introduce a new ranked Endurance Mode. This new game variant's arrival is also accompanied by a few other changes. [Read more] | Read more »
Mitoza is surreal adventure toy you can...
The folks behind the Rusty Lake games have just put a new title onto the App Store. Second Maze, Rusty Lake's collaborative publishing brand, has just brought this 10 year old adventure game from Gal Mamalya to mobile. The best part about all of... | Read more »
Pocket Gamer Awards 2021: You have five...
Three weeks ago our sister site, Pocket Gamer, entered the voting stage for the upcoming Pocket Gamer Awards 2021 and is now in the final stretch. You only have a few hours left to vote for the games you’ve enjoyed on mobile in the past year, as... | Read more »
Patty Stack is a casual arcade game, ava...
Patty Stack is a casual arcade title that's available now for iOS and Android. It's the debut game from developer Feeka Games tasks players with making an increasingly giant burger tower. Think of it as Tower Bloxx but more edible. [Read more] | Read more »
Distract Yourself With These Great Mobil...
There’s a lot going on right now, and I don’t really feel like trying to write some kind of pithy intro for it. All I’ll say is lots of people have been coming together and helping each other in small ways, and I’m choosing to focus on that as I... | Read more »
Genshin Impact Guide - Gacha Strategy: W...
This is part 2 of our Genshin Impact gacha strategy guides. See part 1 here. You can check out more guides for Genshin Impact here. | Read more »
Slashy Camp is a new endless runner insp...
Blue Wizard Digital has released Slashy Camp onto iOS and Android after it spent a short amount of time in early access. [Read more] | Read more »
Kinder World is a relaxing game about lo...
Lumi Interactive is releasing a game called Kinder World later this year on iOS and Android, which is all about looking after houseplants. [Read more] | Read more »
Steam Link Spotlight - Fights in Tight S...
Steam Link Spotlight is a feature where we look at PC games that play exceptionally well using the Steam Link app. Our last entry was on Hades. Read about how it plays using Steam Link over here. | Read more »
Lyxo, the light-based puzzler for mobile...
Vienna-based independent game studio Emoak has just released its unique light-based puzzler for iOS and Android. Founded in 2014 by Tobias Sturn, the company is also the creative force behind the infinite climbing game Paper Climb, as well as the... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

Weekend Sale: $100 off Apple iPad Magic Keybo...
Amazon has Apple iPad Magic Keyboards on sale for $100 off MSRP for a limited time. Amazon’s prices are the lowest available for iPad Magic Keyboard from any Apple reseller this weekend: – Magic... Read more
Gazelle now offering a full line of refurbish...
Gazelle is now offering a full range of discounted, refurbished, unlocked Apple iPhone 12 models starting at $649. iPhones are offered in Fair, Good, and Excellent conditions, and multiple colors are... Read more
These are the latest discounted iPhones Apple...
Apple has a range of Certified Refurbished iPhones available right now starting at only $339. Apple includes a standard one-year warranty, new outer shell, and shipping is free. According to Apple, “... Read more
Save up to $64 on new M1 MacBook Airs at Expe...
Apple reseller Expercom has 2020 13″ M1 MacBook Airs on sale for $51-$64 off Apple’s MSRP with prices starting at $947.96. In addition to their MacBook Air sale prices, take $50 off AppleCare+ when... Read more
Discounts available on 16″ MacBook Pros with...
Upgrade a 16″ 6-Core or 8-Core MacBook Pro from 16GB of standard RAM to 32GB at Adorama, and save $100-$210 over Apple’s price for this custom option: – 16″ 6-Core MacBook Pro/32GB RAM: $2699, save $... Read more
10.9″ iPad Airs on sale for $50-$70 off Apple...
Amazon has new 2020 10.9″ Apple WiFi iPad Airs in stock and on sale today for up to $70 off MSRP with prices starting at $549. Note that Amazon’s sale price might be restricted to certain colors (see... Read more
Apple restocks 2020 27″ 5K iMacs for up to $3...
After an initial offering in January, Apple has restocked a full line of Certified Refurbished 2020 27″ 5K iMacs starting at $1529 and up to $350 off original MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is... Read more
Sale! 16″ 8-Core MacBook Pro for $2449, $350...
Apple reseller Adorama has the 16″ 2.3GHz 8-Core Space Gray MacBook Pro in stock and on sale today for $2449 including free shipping. Their price is $350 off Apple’s MSRP for this model, and it’s the... Read more
Roundup of 13″ Multi-Core Intel MacBook Pro s...
Apple resellers are offering significant sales & deals this week on 2020 13″ MacBook Pros with 10th generation Intel CPUs. Take up to $250 off Apple’s MSRP, get free fast shipping, and/or pay no... Read more
64GB iPhone 8 Plus available for $379 at Appl...
Apple has the 64GB iPhone 8 Plus in Space Gray & Gold colors available for $379 today, Certified Refurbished. Each phone is unlocked and comes with Apple’s standard 1-year warranty and free... Read more

Jobs Board

Geek Squad Advanced Repair *Apple* Professi...
**795178BR** **Job Title:** Geek Squad Advanced Repair Apple Professional **Job Category:** Store Associates **Store Number or Department:** 001406-Allen Park-Store Read more
Geek Squad *Apple* Consultation Professiona...
**796549BR** **Job Title:** Geek Squad Apple Consultation Professional **Job Category:** Store Associates **Store Number or Department:** 001800-Hot Springs-Store Read more
*Apple* Mobility Specialist - Best Buy (Unit...
**796014BR** **Job Title:** Apple Mobility Specialist **Job Category:** Store Associates **Store Number or Department:** 001776-Woodmore Towne Centre-Store **Job Read more
Systems Architect, *Apple* Production Engin...
…package beginning on your first day? If so, we hope you'll keep reading! The Apple Sales Engineering and account team is looking for a stellar presales engineer with Read more
Systems Engineer, Webscale, *Apple* Retail,...
…beginning on your first day? If so, we hope you'll keep reading! The Apple Sales Engineering team is looking for a pre-sales engineer with Enterprise engineering Read more
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