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Talking
Volume Number:1
Issue Number:12
Column Tag:Assembly Language Lab

The Talking Mac

By Dan Weston, The NerdWorks, Salem, OR

In the May, 1985, issue of the Macintosh Software Supplement Apple released a package of tools and code units collectively called MacinTalk 1.1. With these tools programmers can make their Macintosh programs talk without any additional hardware. In this article I'll explain the general workings of MacinTalk and develop a small application program in assembly language that will show you how to use the main features of MacinTalk in your own programs.

Overview of MacinTalk

The MacinTalk system's most basic component is a driver that contains several procedures available to your programs. The driver is contained in a file called 'MacinTalk', and this file must be on the same volume as any application that wishes to use the MacinTalk driver. The most basic function of the driver is to convert ASCII strings of phonetic codes into speech. You can also use another part of the driver to convert standard English text into phonetic codes which can then be spoken by the driver. Furthermore, there are parts of the driver that you can use to control the rate of speaking and the pitch.

Beyond the actual driver procedures that you will be using in your programs, there are a few tools that are useful to you while you are preparing a program that will use speech. The program 'Speech Lab' allows you to enter English text in one window and then hear the MacinTalk speech and see the phonetic translation in another window. This program is very useful for learning the tricks of the phonetic code system used by Macintalk. For example, the English sentence "This is a test." is translated into the phonetic string,"DHIHS IHZ AH TEHST.#". This program can be used to pre-translate strings that your program will speak when the strings are known ahead of time. It is more efficient, both in time and memory, to feed phonetic strings directly to the MacinTalk driver rather than relying on translation at run time. Also, if you pre-translate you will be able to fine tune the phonetics, because the translation is not always perfect.

The translation of English to phonetics is governed by hundreds of phonetic and grammatical rules contained in the Macintalk driver, but these rules will not get every word right. Another program in the Macintalk 1.1 package is 'Exception Edit'. This program allows you to create a special file of tricky words and their correct phonetic translation. Exception Edit lets you experiment with the phonetic strings until you get them right, and then save those translations for later use. A file created by Exception Edit can be automatically loaded and utilized by mentioning it when the MacinTalk driver is opened, as shown in a later section of this article.

Fig. 1 Program Output

The Macintalk Driver

There are seven procedures in the MacinTalk driver that your program can call. They are listed briefly below.

FUNCTION SpeechOn(ExceptionsFile: Str255; theSpeech: SpeechHandle): SpeechErr;

This function opens up the driver and initializes the values for speecd and pitch. If you pass a null string for ExceptionsFile, then the translation of English to phonetics will follow the standard rules. If you pass a valid file name for ExceptionsFile, then that file, which must have been created by Exception Edit, will be used to help guide translation. If you pass the string 'noReader' for ExceptionsFile, then the driver will be opened but it will only be able to receive phonetic input and it will not be able to translate English to phonetics.

PROCEDURE SpeechOff(theSpeech: SpeechHandle)

This procedure closes the driver and deallocates any storage that it has been using.

FUNCTION MacinTalk(theSpeech: SpeechHandle; Phonemes:Handle): SpeechErr

This is the work horse of the driver. This is where phoneme code strings are converted to speech. The handle to the phonemes should refer to a string of ASCII phonemes without a length byte.

FUNCTION Reader(theSpeech: SpeechHandle; EnglishInput: Ptr; InputLength: 
LongInt; PhoneticOutput: Handle): SpeechErr

This is where English strings are translated into phonetic strings that can then be fed to MacinTalk. The Ptr to EnglishInput should not point to a length byte of a Str255. Point to the first character instead. The Handle for PhoneticOutput can start out as a zero length Handle, and Reader will dynamically grow the Handle to fit the output.

PROCEDURE SpeechRate(theSpeech: SpeechHandle; theRate:INTEGER)

This sets the rate at which words are spoken, in words/min. The rate must be between 85 and 425 words/min.

PROCEDURE SpeechPitch(theSpeech: SpeechHandle; thePitch: INTEGER; theMode: 
FOMode)

This sets the baseline pitch, in Hz, and sets the pitch mode, either natural or robotic.

PROCEDURE SpeechSex(theSpeech: SpeechHandle; theSex:Sex)

This is not implemented in MacinTalk 1.1

The glue which calls the various procedures in the driver is contained in the file SpeechASM.Rel, also available in the Software Supplement. Make sure that you include SpeechASM.Rel in the link file for you application so that the driver routines will be available to your code. Also, you must XREF the individual routines that you wish to use. See the listings of CheapTalk.ASM and CheapTalk.LINK for examples.

CheapTalk: a simple speech application example

The software supplement contains the source code for a very short example program that shows how to use the speech driver. As usual, it is in Pascal, so we assembly language programmers have to muddle along and figure things out ourselves. In order to learn the system myself, and to provide a clear example of the main features of MacinTalk, I have written CheapTalk, a dialog based application that speaks pre-translated text stored in a resource file and also translates and speaks user input at run time. CheapTalk opens a dialog and speaks the static message one time. Then it waits for the user to type English text into an edit text box in the dialog. Hitting return or pressing a 'Say it' button will translate the English text into phonemes and then say it.

This application will show you how to open and close the driver, and how to use MacinTalk and Reader from assembly language. It does not use the procedures to control the speed of pitch, but I imagine that you can figure that out for yourselves.

In my discussion of the code, listed in listing 1 as CheapTalk.ASM, I will concentrate on the parts pertinent to MacinTalk, and leave many of the details of the shell to speak for themselves.

Making the connection to SpeechASM.Rel

Toward the beginning of CheapTalk.ASM, notice the XREF statements necessary for the linker to establish the connection between our routine calls and the SpeechASM.Rel code that we link with our code.

XREF  SpeechOn ; open driver
XREF  MacinTalk  ; speak phonetic string
XREF  Reader; translate English to phonetics
XREF  SpeechOff  ; close driver

The linker control file is listed in listing 2 as CheapTalk.LINK. SpeechASM.Rel is a code file which contains the glue routines necessary to call the individual procedures contained in the driver. SpeechASM.Rel does not contain the actual speech routines, just short procedures to call the appropriate section of the MacinTalk driver. All the routines of the speech driver expect their parameter on the stack.

Setting up the global variables for speech

Next, notice the global variable, 'theSpeech', defined as a long word to hold the handle to the speech globals that will be allocated when the driver is opened. We only have to define a variable to hold the handle, the opening routine will allocate the neccessary storage for the speech globals. Other globals that we need to define include a word length flag that we use to show if the driver was successfully opened, a 256 byte block to hold an English string, and a handle which will be used for phonetic output from Reader.

theSpeech DS.L 1 ; handle to speech driver globals
speechOKDS.W1  ; our flag to show if driver opened 
theString DS.B 256 ; keep our English string here
phHandleDS.L1  ; handle to phonetic string

If you look at CheapTalk.ASM you will see that there are several other global variables defined to use as VAR parameters associated with maintaining the dialog box.

Opening the driver

When we call SpeechOn to open the driver, we specify the null string (a string with length 0, which we define in the static variable area at the end of the code) for the ExceptionsFile so that the Reader will translate English to phonetics using the default rules. If we had a specific exceptions file that we had created with Exception Edit, then we could pass in that file name so that that exception file would be used. We also pass the address of our global variable, theSpeech, so that it can be updated to hold the handle to the speech globals which will be allocated by the open routine.

; assume that driver will open alright, set our flag to TRUE
 MOVE.W #1,speechOK(A5) ; set flag to TRUE
; now open driver to use default rules for translation
;FUNCTION SpeechOn(ExceptionsFile:Str255; 
;  theSpeech:SpeechHandle): SpeechErr

 CLR.W  -(SP)  ; space for result
 PEA  NULL; defined at end of code
 PEA  theSpeech(A5); handle for speech global
 JSR  SpeechOn ; jump to open routine
 MOVE.W (SP)+,D0 ; get result code
 BEQ  @1; branch if open OK
 
; if driver open not successful then clear speechOK flag
; to prevent further use of invalid driver
 MOVE.W #0,speechOK(A5) ; set flag to FALSE
; you could also dispay an error dialog here

@1 ; branch to this point if open is successful

You can see how the result code is checked after SpeechOn to see if the driver was opened successfully. In the event of a non-zero result, impying a problem with the opening, we set the speechOK flag to 0 and continue on with the program. All other parts of the program which use the speech driver first check the speechOK flag to make sure that there is a valid driver to work with.

Speaking pre-translated speech

The static message in our dialog box is "This is a talking dialog demonstration." There is a phonetic translation of that string kept in the resource file as a resource of type PHNM. The translation was done using Speech Lab, and the resulting phonetic string put into the RMaker source file, listed in listing 3 as CheapTalk.R. I created the PHNM resource type for RMaker so that the phonetic string would not have a length byte. As a general strategy you can translate the static message of any dialog into a PHNM resource with the same resource ID number as the dialog. That way, it is easy to display the dialog and speak the message together.

When the PHNM resource is loaded into memory by GetResource, you get a handle to the phoneme string that you can pass to MacinTalk to recite. Remember, no length byte on phonetic strings! Generally, you should to pre-translate any strings that you know at assembly time so as not to waste time and memory translating at run time and also to insure higher quality speech by testing and refining the phonetic strings. Look at the following code to see how the PHNM resource is retrieved and then fed to MacinTalk.

; first check our flag to make sure that driver is open
 TST.W  speechOK(A5) 
 BEQ  @2; driver not valid
; branch around speech stuff
; driver valid, go ahead and speak
;FUNCTION 
;  GetResource(theType:ResType;ID: INTEGER): Handle
 CLR.L  -(SP)  ; space for result
 MOVE.L #'PHNM',-(SP); resource type PHNM
 MOVE.W #theDialog,-(SP)  ; use same ID# as dialog
 _GetResource
 MOVE.L (SP)+,A0                  ; handle to phoneme string

 ;FUNCTIONMacinTalk(theSpeech:SpeechHandle;
 ; Phonemes:Handle):SpeechErr
 CLR.W  -(SP)  ; space for result
 MOVE.L theSpeech(A5),-(SP)   ; speech global handle
 MOVE.L A0,-(SP) ; handle to phonemes
 JSR  MacinTalk  ; say it
 MOVE.W (SP)+,D0 ; get result code

@2 ; branch to here to avoid speaking with invalid driver

Translating English to Phonetics and then Speaking

After saying the static dialog message upon opening, the program waits for the user to enter English text in the edit text window of the dialog. The program watches the results of ModalDialog until the 'Say it' button is pushed, at which point it uses GetDItem and GetIText to get the current English text of the edit text item. That text, which is a Str255, is fed into Reader to translate it into a phonetic string. Please notice that when we pass the English text into Reader we skip over the length byte at the head of the Str255. We do, however, use the length byte, after coercing it to a long word, as the length input to Reader. The Handle which we use to hold the phonetic output of Reader is initially associated with a zero length block, but Reader grows the block automatically to fit the output. Look at this code fragment which feeds the English string to Reader. (Assume that the string has already been placed in the variable 'theString' by calls to GetDItem and GetIText.)

; set up an empty handle first for Reader to fill with phonemes
;FUNCTION NewHandle(logicalSize: Size): Handle
; logicalSize => D0, Handle => A0
 MOVEQ  #0,D0  ; set up empty handle
 _NewHandle
 MOVE.L A0,phHandle(A5) ; save Handle for later
 
;FUNCTION Reader(theSpeech:SpeechHandle; 
;EnglishInput:Ptr;
;InputLength:LongInt: PhoneticOutput:Handle);: SpeechErr
 CLR.W  -(SP)  ; space for result
 MOVE.L theSpeech(A5),-(SP)              ; speech globals
 PEA  theString+1(A5); Ptr to string, skip length 
 CLR.L  D0; clear out D0
 MOVE.B theString(A5),D0  ; put length byte in D0
 MOVE.L D0,-(SP) ; use longInt for length
 MOVE.L phHandle(A5),-(SP); we just allocated this             
 ;handle
 JSR  Reader; do translation
 MOVE.W (SP)+,D0 ; get result

Once we have used Reader to translate the English text into a phonetic string, we pass the handle to the phonemes to MacinTalk, much as we did earlier, to hear it spoken. Here is the code which speaks the translation and then deallocates the handle which held the phonetic string. It is important to deallocate this handle after the phonemes are spoken to avoid cluttering up memory with old sayings.

;FUNCTION MacinTalk(theSpeech: SpeechHandle
;Phonemes: Handle):SpeechErr
 CLR.W  -(SP)  ; space for result
 MOVE.L theSpeech(A5),-(SP)    ; speech globals
 MOVE.L phHandle(A5),-(SP); handle to phonemes
 JSR  MacinTalk  ; say it
 MOVE.W (SP)+,D0 ; get result
; deallocate handle 
;PROCEDURE DisposHandle(h: Handle)
; h => A0
 MOVE.L phHandle(A5),A0 ;  where phonemes are
 _DisposHandle

This process can be generalized to other situations where you want to translate arbitrary English text into speech. Just get a pointer to the first character of the text, get the length of the text, allocate an empty handle, and feed it all to Reader. The phonetic output of Reader can then by handed to MacinTalk to recite.

Closing the driver

We merely make a call to SpeechOff with theSpeech as input to close up the driver and deallocate the memory used by it. Generally, Macintalk will use at least 20 k of memory, plus dynamic buffers equal to about 800 bytes/second of uniterrupted speech (usually less than 10 seconds). In addition, Reader utilizes 10k plus a buffer to hold the translated text.

;PROCEDURESpeechOff(theSpeech: SpeechHandle)
 MOVE.L theSpeech(A5),-(SP)  ; handle to speech                ;globals
 JSR  SpeechOff  ; close it up

Putting it all together

Listings 1, 2, and 3 show the assembler source file, the linker control file, and the RMaker source file. You should assemble CheapTalk.ASM, then link it with CheapTalk.LINK. One thing to notice about the output file from the linker is that it is not a functional application until it is combined with the necessary resources by RMaker. Since Link output files are normally application type file, CheapTalk.LINK assigns a file type of 'CODE' so that the resulting output file will not have the characteristic diamond shaped icon. The final step of the program development is to run CheapTalk.R through RMaker to create the DLOG, DITL, and PHNM resources and combine them in one application file with the output file from the linker. The output of RMaker, Cheap Talk, will be a independent application program which can be moved to any disk and run as long as the driver file, MacinTalk, is also on that disk.

Summary

This discussion has been rather superficial. You are encouraged to study the source code and steal whatever parts of it you find useful for your own applications. All parts of the MacinTalk system are available in the Software Supplement or in the DL8 area of the Mac Developers interest group (PCS-7) on Compuserve, including the MacinTalk 1.1 documentation that Apple provides. This documentation is a good place to learn more about the phonetic symbols that MacinTalk uses and some of the finer points of the availale routines. You should also be aware that there is a licensing fee if you distribute programs that use MacinTalk 1.1, so contact Apple before you start shipping disks with MacinTalk on them.

Fig. 2 Program files

; CheapTalk.ASM
; A short program to demonstrate how to 
; use Macintalk 1.1 from assembly language

; This program displays a dialog and speaks
; the written message in the dialog

; It also will speak English strings written 
; into an edit text box in the dialog

; copyright August 1985
; Dan Weston

; This program uses subroutines from the file SpeechASM.rel
; You must include that file in your link file list
; and XREF the particular routines here

; You must also have the file 'MacinTalk' on the same volume
; as  this application program

XREF  SpeechOn   ; open driver
XREF  MacinTalk  ; say something
XREF  Reader; translate English to phonemes
XREF  SpeechOff  ; close the driver

theDialog EQU  1 ; resource ID # of dialog
sayitbutton EQU  1 ; item # for 'say it '
quitbuttonEQU  2 ; item # for 'quit'
usertextEQU 3  ; item # for edit text box


INCLUDE Mactraps.D

; --------------- Global Variables -------------------

theSpeech DS.L 1 ; handle to speech driver globals
speechOKDS.W1  ; our flag to show if driver open
theString DS.B 256 ; VAR for GetIText
phHandleDS.L1  ; handle to phonetic string

ItemHit DS.W1  ; VAR for modal dialog
theType DS.W1  ; VAR for GetDItem
theItem DS.L1  ; VAR for GetDItem
theRect DS.W4  ; VAR for GetDItem


; --------------- Initialization ----------------------

BSRInitManagers  ; at end of source file

; -------------- Open the Speech Driver ----------------

; Open speech driver to use default rules

; assume that driver will open alright, set our flag to TRUE

MOVE.W  #1,speechOK(A5) ; set flag to TRUE

 
CLR.W -(SP) ; result
PEANULL ; defined at end of source code
PEAtheSpeech(A5) ; VAR theSpeech
JSRSpeechOn ; jump to to open routine
MOVE.W  (SP)+,D0 ; check result
BEQ@1   ; branch if ok
 
; If driver open not successful then clear speechOK flag
; to prevent further use of invalid driver
 
MOVE.W  #0,speechOK(A5)
 
; You could also put an error dialog here 
 
@1 ; branch to this point if open is successful

;--------------- Get the Dialog from the Resource file --

 
CLR.L -(SP) ;Clear Space For DialogPtr
MOVE  #theDialog,-(SP)  ; Resource # 
CLR.L -(SP) ;Storage Area on heap
MOVE.L  #-1,-(SP);Above All Others
_GetNewDialog    ;Get New Dialog
MOVE.L  (SP)+,D6 ;Move Handle To D6

;PROCEDURESetPort (gp: GrafPort)
MOVE.L  D6,-(SP) ;Move Dialog Pointer To Stack
_SetPort;Make It The Current Port

; usually you would not use DrawDialog, but we need to draw
; the dialog contents once before saying them, then go to
; Modal dialog which will draw the contents again

;PROCEDURE  DrawDialog(dp:DialogPtr)
MOVE.L  D6,-(SP)
_DrawDialog 
 
;------------------- Speak pre-translated speech -------

; now Say the static text item which has been pre-translated
; into a phoneme string with the same ID as the dialog

; first, check our flag to make sure that driver is open

TST.W speechOK(A5) 
BEQ@2   ; driver not valid
 ; branch around speech stuff
; driver valid, go ahead and speak

 
CLR.L -(SP) ; space for result
MOVE.L  #'PHNM',-(SP); resource type PHNM
MOVE.W  #theDialog,-(SP)  ; use same ID as dialog  
_GetResource
MOVE.L  (SP)+,A0 ; handle to phoneme string
 
 
 
CLR.W -(SP) ; space for result code
MOVE.L  theSpeech(A5),-(SP) ; speech global handle
MOVE.L  A0,-(SP) ; phonemes, from above
JSRMacinTalk; say it 
MOVE.W  (SP)+,D0 ; get result code

@2 ; branch to here to avoid speaking with invalid driver

;------------------- Dialog loop ------------------            
; now process the dialog

dialogloop

;PROCEDUREModalDialog (filterProc: ProcPtr;
; VAR itemHit: INTEGER)
CLR.L -(SP) ;default filter proc
PEAItemHit(A5)   ;Item Hit Data
_ModalDialog
 
; see which button was pushed
CMP.W #quitbutton,ItemHit(A5) ; quit button?
BEQcloseit
 
CMP.W #sayitbutton,ItemHit(A5)   ; say it?
BEQsayit
 ; none of the above
BRAdialogloop    ; go around again
 

;----------------- Translate English to Phonetics and speak ------
sayit

; first, check our flag to make sure that driver is open

TST.W speechOK(A5) 
BEQ@3   ; driver not valid
 ; branch around speech stuff
; driver valid, go ahead and speak
; get the current text in the edit text box

 
MOVE.L  D6,-(SP) ; we saved DialogPtr here
MOVE.W  #usertext,-(SP) ; the edit text item
PEAtheType(A5) ; VAR type
PEAtheItem(A5)   ; VAR item
PEAtheRect(A5)   ; VAR box
_GetDItem
 
;PROCEDUREGetIText(item:Handle;VAR text: Str255)
MOVE.L  theItem(A5),-(SP) ; result of GetDItem
PEAtheString(A5) ; VAR text
_GetIText
 
; now feed the text into reader to translate it into phonemes
; set up an empty handle first for Reader to fill with phonemes

;FUNCTION NewHandle(logicalSize: Size): Handle
; logicalSize => D0, Handle => A0
MOVEQ #0,D0 ; set up empty handle
_NewHandle
MOVE.L  A0,phHandle(A5) ; save Handle for later
 
CLR.W -(SP) ; space for result
MOVE.L  theSpeech(A5),-(SP) ; speech globals
PEAtheString+1(A5) ;Ptr to string, skip length byte
CLR.L D0; clear out D0
MOVE.B  theString(A5),D0  ; put length byte in D0
MOVE.L  D0,-(SP) ; use LongInt for length
MOVE.L  phHandle(A5),-(SP); we just allocated this
JSRReader ; do translation
MOVE.W  (SP)+,D0 ; get result
 
; now feed the phonemes to Macintalk

;FUNCTION ;MacInTalk(theSpeech:SpeechHandle;Phonemes:Handle)
 ; :SpeechErr
CLR.W -(SP) ; space for result code
MOVE.L  theSpeech(A5),-(SP) ; speech globals handle
MOVE.L  phHandle(A5),-(SP); handle to phonemes
JSRMacinTalk; say it 
MOVE.W  (SP)+,D0 ; get result code
 
; deallocate handle and loop back for more

; PROCEDURE DisposHandle (h: Handle)
; h => A0
MOVE.L  phHandle(A5),A0 ; this is where the phonemes are
_DisposHandle
 
@3 ; branch to here to avoid speaking with invalid driver

BRAdialogloop
 
 
 
;------------------ Close up shop -----------------------

closeit
;PROCEDURECloseDialog (theDialog: DialogPtr);
MOVE.L  D6,-(SP) ;Get Dialog Pointer To Close
_CloseDialog;Close Window

; first, check our flag to make sure that driver is open

TST.W speechOK(A5) 
BEQ@4   ; driver not valid
 ; branch around speech stuff
; driver valid, go ahead and close it

; PROCEDURE SpeechOff(theSpeech: SpeechHandle)
MOVE.L  theSpeech(A5),-(SP)       ; handle to speech globals
JSRSpeechOff; close it up
 
@4 ; branch to here to avoid closing invalid driver

_ExitToShell;Return To Finder


;--------------- Initialize Managers Subroutine ----------
InitManagers
;PROCEDUREInitGraf (globalPtr: QDPtr);
PEA-4(A5) ;Space Created For Quickdraw's Use
_InitGraf ;Init Quickdraw
_InitFonts;Init Font Manager
_InitWindows;Init Window Manager
;PROCEDUREInitDialogs (restartProc: ProcPtr);
CLR.L -(SP) ; NIL restart proc
_InitDialogs;Init Dialog Manager
;procedure TEinit
_TEInit
_InitCursor ; set arrow cursor
RTS; end of InitManagers
 
;--------------------- Static Data -----------------------------

NULL  DC.W0 ; null string


/OUTPUT CheapTalkCode

; Since this code file will not run successfully until it has been
; joined with the resources by RMaker, set its file type so
; that it cannot be mistakenly run from the desktop.
; Link output files are usually of type APPL

/TYPE 'CODE' 'LINK'

; link our code, CheapTalk, with the glue for the speech driver 
; routines

CheapTalk
SpeechASM

$
* CheapTalk.R
* create the application Cheap Talk
* First define all the resources, and then include the code
* output file name, File type, file creator

MDS2:Cheap Talk
APPLCHTK

* dialog resource is a vanilla dialog
* make it pre-loaded (4) to speed things up

Type DLOG
   ,1 (4)
  
60 100 260 400
Visible  NoGoAway
1
0
1

* DITL resource for dialog has one static text item,
* one edit text item,
* and two buttons: 'Say it' and 'Quit'
* The 'Say it' button is item #1 so that hitting return is 
* the same as clicking 'Say it'
* make it pre-loaded (4) to speed things up

Type DITL
demo,1 (4)
4

Button
170 200 190 250
Say it

Button
170 50 190 100
Quit

EditText
40 30 150 270
Enter English text here

StaticText Disabled
10 30 30 290
This is a talking dialog demonstration

* PHNM resource is defined by us to be a string without length
* byte it is a phonetic translation of the static tect in the DITL
* of the same resource #
* make it pre-loaded (4) to speed things up

Type PHNM = GNRL 
demo,1 (4)
.S
DHIH9S, IHZ AH TAO4KIHNX DAY6AELAA1G DIH1MUNSTREY5SHUN #

* now include the code produced by the linker
INCLUDE MDS2:CheapTalkCode
 

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Detective Di is a point-and-click murder mystery set in Tang Dynasty-era China. You'll take on the role of China's best-known investigator, Di Renjie, as he solves a series of grisly murders that will ultimately lead him on a collision course with... | Read more »
Dissidia Final Fantasy Opera Omnia is se...
Dissidia Final Fantasy Opera Omnia, one of Square Enix's many popular mobile RPGs, has announced a plethora of in-game events that are set to take place over the summer. This will include several rewards, Free Multi Draws and more. [Read more] | Read more »
Sphaze is a neat-looking puzzler where y...
Sphaze is a neat-looking puzzler where you'll work to guide robots through increasingly elaborate mazes. It's set in a visually distinct world that's equal parts fantasy and sci-fi, and it's finally launched today for iOS and Android devices. [... | Read more »
Apple Arcade is in trouble
Yesterday, Bloomberg reported that Apple is disappointed in the performance of Apple Arcade and will be shifting their approach to the service by focusing on games that can retain subscribers and canceling other upcoming releases that don't fit... | Read more »
Pixel Petz, an inventive platform for de...
Pixel Petz has built up a sizeable player base thanks to its layered, easy-to-understand creative tools and friendly social experience. It revolves around designing, trading, and playing with a unique collection of pixel art pets, and it's out now... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

B&H Photo offers $200-$300 discounts on A...
B&H Photo has new 16″ MacBook Pros on sale today for $200-$300 off Apple’s MSRP, starting at $2149. Expedited shipping is free to many addresses in the US: – 2019 16″ 2.6GHz 6-Core MacBook Pro... Read more
Clearance 2019 15″ MacBook Pros on sale today...
Amazon-owned Woot is blowing out Apple refurbished, clearance 2019 15″ MacBook Pros starting at only $1579 and up to $950 off Apple’s original MSRP. According to Woot, “These MacBooks are Refurbished... Read more
Apple Refurbished iMac Pros available for $35...
Amazon-owned Woot is selling Apple refurbished 27″ 3.2GHz 8-Core iMac Pros for $3599.99 shipped. That’s $1400 off Apple’s original MSRP for this model. According to Woot, these iMac Pros are “Factory... Read more
Clearance 2019 13″ 2.4GHz/256GB MacBook Pro o...
B&H Photo has dropped their price on the clearance 2019 13″ 2.4GHz/256GB Quad-Core Silver MacBook Pro by $500 off Apple’s original MSRP to a new low of only $1299. Expedited shipping is free to... Read more
$219 Apple AirPods Pro are back at Verizon, s...
Verizon has Apple AirPods Pro on sale again for a limited time for $219.99 on their online store. Their price is $30 off Apple’s MSRP, and it’s the lowest price we’ve seen for AirPods Pro. Available... Read more
Apple’s $779 13″ MacBook Air deal returns to...
Apple has clearance, Certified Refurbished, 2019 13″ MacBook Airs available again starting at $779. Each MacBook features a new outer case, comes with a standard Apple one-year warranty, and is... Read more
$200 13″ MacBook Pro discounts are back at Am...
Amazon has 2020 13″ 2.0GHz MacBook Pros on sale again today for $150-$200 off Apple’s MSRP. Shipping is free. Be sure to purchase the MacBook Pro from Amazon, rather than a third-party seller, and... Read more
Deal Alert! Apple AirPods with Wireless Charg...
Sams Club has Apple AirPods with Wireless Charging Case on sale on their online store for only $149.98 from July 6, 2020 to July 9, 2020. Their price is $50 off Apple’s MSRP, and it’s the lowest... Read more
Xfinity Mobile promo: Apple iPhone XS models...
Take $300 off the purchase of any Apple iPhone XS model at Xfinity Mobile while supplies last. Service plan required: – 64GB iPhone XS: $599.99 save $300 – 256GB iPhone XS: $749.99 save $300 – 512GB... Read more
New July 2020 promo at US Cellular: Switch an...
US Cellular has introduced a new July 2020 deal offering free 64GB Apple iPhone 11 smartphones to customers opening a new line of service. No trade-in required, and discounts are applied via monthly... Read more

Jobs Board

Product Manager, *Apple* Commercial Sales -...
Product Manager, Apple Commercial Sales Austin, TX, US Requisition Number:77652 As an Apple Product Manager for the Commercial Sales team at Insight, you Read more
Physical Therapist Assistant - *Apple* Hill...
Physical Therapist Assistant - Apple Hill Rehab - Full Time Tracking Code 62519 Job Description General Summary: Under the direct supervision of a licensed Physical Read more
Operating Room Assistant, *Apple* Hill Surg...
Operating Room Assistant, Apple Hill Surgical Center - Full Time, Day Shift, Monday - Saturday availability required Tracking Code 62363 Job Description Operating Read more
Perioperative RN - ( *Apple* Hill Surgical C...
Perioperative RN - ( Apple Hill Surgical Center) Tracking Code 60593 Job Description Monday - Friday - Full Time Days Possible Saturdays General Summary: Under the Read more
Product Manager, *Apple* Commercial Sales -...
Product Manager, Apple Commercial Sales Austin, TX, US Requisition Number:77652 As an Apple Product Manager for the Commercial Sales team at Insight, you Read more
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