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AppleTalk Client
Volume Number:1
Issue Number:10
Column Tag:Pascal Procedures

"Dial a Fortune Apple Talk Client"

By Alan Wootton, President, Top-Notch Productions, MacTutor Contributing Editor

Fig. 1 Phone type network

AppleTalk and Macintosh Pascal

This month's topic is AppleTalk. In collaboration with Bob Denny (see the column 'C Workshop' in this issue), I present a pair of programs that form 'Dial-A-Fortune'. The names of the two programs presented below are Get_Fortune and Send_Fortune. These are fully conversational with Bob Denny's server version, which performs the task of Send_Fortune. Of course, to try them, you will need two Macs. Either my Pascal Send_Fortune or Bob's server program run in one Mac while my Pascal Get_Fortune runs in the other Mac as the "requestor". Get_Fortune will request fortunes from either of the C or Pascal Send_Fortune servers which respond by sending back a fortune cookie! In this way, all the concepts of AppleTalk are illustrated. (Note: due to space limitations, the C version of Bob's requestor program was not included in the C column. Use my Get_Fortune requestor instead. A C requestor program to compliment Bob's server will be published in the C workshop next month.) If you are using Pascal, everything you need is here in this column for two way AppleTalk communications.

Appletalk

I started this project with only a passing knowledge of networks. Networks are for hooking computers together, right? So, I went to the store and bought one -- actually, two -- one for each computer. After paying $50 retail for each, I hurried home to try it out. Shock! What you get are merely cables to wire your machines together, and a short pamphlet on how this is done. A child could do it but having the wires in place does not a network make. You need software.

I referred immediately to Inside Macintosh. After careful study I identified two types of software that are needed. There are some drivers that you install in your system like a desk accessory, or like a new printer driver, and there are Macintosh Programs that use the drivers. Searching through the billions of disks sent to the Apple Certified Developers uncovered the drivers (presumably you can get them at the store too), and I installed them. Still, no network. Actually, it was like having telephones but not knowing how to talk.

I could have gone to the store to look for software to use my network, but I decided to write my own (actually, Bob Denny gave me Dial-A-Fortune first). So, back to the Bible -- excuse me -- Inside Macintosh.

What I found are many programs sending many messages at many levels of organization. The drivers send and receive data over the net at the drop of a hat. On the top of them all seemed to be a thing called AppleTalk Transaction Protocol, ATP for short. What this is, are some routines you can call to send and receive data (up to 512 bytes at a time). ATP is pretty clever. It will wait until it is its turn to talk, it will retransmit requests if no reply is received, and more. In the descriptions of the routines, I found numbers to set to indicate what data to send, and how persistent I wanted ATP to be about delivery. I found something else, too.

To use a network to 'hook computers together' you have to know something about the rules and conventions. Just as you cannot mail a letter without understanding about countries, cities, streets, addresses, and names, you also cannot make a phone call without knowing when you need an area code, or when you need a prefix, or when you can just dial 8 and then an extension. As I found, you must tell ATP three things to have a message delivered (refer now to the diagrams of networks in action).

Fig. 2. AppleTalk type network

First is the network number or zone (an integer). This is for situations where your network is connected to other networks. For me this is like an area code in a world with two telephones -- Not real useful. After ATP knows which network you're calling, it wants to know which node you want (a byte). I had two nodes. Each computer with a serial port, running the drivers, is a node. This is as if each of my computers were a whole town, each meriting it's own prefix, even though there may be only one phone in each town. Simple so far, but now my misconceptions begin to show. This network is for connecting programs together, not computers. The final destination of any message is a socket. For this ATP requires a socket number (a byte. Personally, I think that 'socket' is a poor choice of words for this; it brings the image of a connecter to mind, not a software process). This is analagous to the last four digits of a phone number. Even though there is only one 'phone' in each of two 'towns' you still must 'dial' an 'area code' (net number), a 'prefix' (node number), and the 'last four' (socket number) for a 'call' to go through. So, lets send some messages!

What is the number for the place we wish to call? Telephones are considered mostly permanent installations and are given permanent numbers (a very IBM type of mentality). Area codes especially won't change (even though this just happened to L.A. when they split the city into two areas where there was previously one). For AppleTalk the designers decided that numbers might change a lot and this would become a drag (it would be). So they decided that they would make it so that numbers could change all the time. This is a lot like a system where every time you plug your phone in the wall you call the phone company with your name and they give you a brand new number. Makes it pretty hard for some one to call you! But wait -- as the lazy ones among us have already guessed, all you have to do is call directory assistance before every call (a very Apple type of mentality). This way it doesn't matter what your friend's number is this week; you can always call him. AppleTalk works exactly this way, except directory assistance is called Name Binding Protocol, NBP for short.

When you call directory assistance the first thing they want to know is "Which city, please". NBP will search all the cities, or nodes, for the name you want, but you must provide a string for the zone (area code) you want. If you are calling directory assistance in another state you probably called first to get the area code and then called (area code) 555-1212 for the number. NBP will do this all in one inquiry. So, before every call you ask NPB for the number of the entity with a particular name, in a particular zone. NBP, unlike the phone company, will also look in the yellow pages. You see, there is another string you pass to NBP which is meant to be an identifier for the 'type' of party you wish to reach. This is really a superior system (are you listening Ma Bell?). All parties on the system are identified by their zone, their name, and their type. You can ask NBP for all the numbers in any combination of these. Think how nice it would be to dial national directory assistance and ask for all the Smiths in L.A. that are in the computer business. Only the names are used. The numbers are only a necessary evil to be ignored as much as possible.

Now that we know how to deal with the authorities involved lets get down to the nitty gritty and see if we can establish communication. Everyone get out your copies of Inside Mac, boot your Macs, and follow along.

Inside Inside Appletalk

It will be necessary to refer to the AppleTalk programmers guide. This is the 'Programmer's Guide' section in Inside Appletalk and the 'AppleTalk' section of Inside MacIntosh (regular or phone book version). They are all the same (first draft 1/31/85). Inside AppleTalk contains chapters describing in detail the many philosophies and protocols involved. The only routines needed are the Name-Binding protocol and the AppleTalk Transaction protocol.

The Appletalk section begins with brief descriptions of the various levels of service involved. You can ignore references to link access protocol (LAP) and datagram delivery protocol (DDP). On page 16 a description of how to call AppleTalk from Pascal begins. This is all for the Lisa-Pascal Workshop and is therefore completely worthless. Skim to page 66. Also ignore the AbusRecord type in the summary. The data types we will use are all in the programs that follow and I present a diagram for easy reference. Don't worry about assembly language. We will simply use the parameter block lists presented after each routine name. The method of access to AppleTalk will be to make device manager control calls directly to the drivers involved. This is simply illustrated in the code that follows. Following NPB are instructions on page 78 for making your own handlers. We definitely don't need this so skip to the summary on page 86. Again, watch out for the 'Pascal' interface; we are using the assembly language information.

ATP

The AppleTalk Transaction Protocol (ATP) is the main purpose behind the other, lower level, routines. ATP is used to send and receive messages on the system.

Although messages can be sent anonymously, every receiver has an address. The address (sometimes called the internet address) consists of a network number, a node number and a socket number. We will worry how to find an address later, so for now assume this is taken care of. The network number is to specify which of several individual appletalk networks the reciever is on. This is presently not used. The node number specifies which Mac (or other processor) the message is to go to. The socket number specifies which of several entities (desk accessories for instance) the message is to go to.

To send a message somewhere on the network use the function SendRequest. Note that not only is a message sent but a reply is secured also. To use SendRequest you must know the address of the receiver. In our example the mesage sent is ignored and the reply contains a Pascal-style string which is a fortune.

In order to receive messages (not merely replies) you (meaning your program) must declare yourself as an address capable of receiving requests. To do this call OpenATPSkt. When you are done call CloseATPSkt. Once you have an open socket you may then ask to receive messages. To do this call GetRequest. You may use asynhcronous device manager calls in order to not tie up the system but in this example we will simply wait (hang) for a message. When a request is received call SendResponse to send the reply.

Fig. 3 Appletalk Data structures

Name-Binding Protocol

Whenever a program opens a socket, ATP assigns an address to it. The address could be any valid address so it would be very hard for anyone to already know your address. To receive messages it is necessary to supply a name for that socket. Then another entity can call NBP with your name and NBP will find your address.

To do this call RegisterName. Each name is made of three strings. The strings are called the object string, the type string, and the zone string. The zone string is used to name which network one is on, and since multiple networks are not in common use '*' is usually used for the zone string. The type string is to declare the purpose of this particular socket. Sockets could be used for receiving mail or for providing file access. Each function should use a unique type string. Our example uses 'Dial-A-Fortune' as the type. The name string is to differentiate between several sockets that all offer the same service. For example, my Dial-A-Fortune socket has an object name of 'MacPascal Fortunes', and Bob Denny's Dial-A-Fortune socket has the object name of 'Confuscious'. It might be wise to add a unique identifier, like the disk name, or the users name, on the end of this string (for instance 'Confuscious-Bobs disk').

Once you have called RegisterName it is much more likely that someone will send a message to your GetRequest. After you don't want anymore messages you should call RemoveName and then you may close the socket.

If you want to send a message and you don't know the address to use you can call LookUpName. You supply a name and LookUpName will find the address. As a matter of fact, you can look up many names. LookUpName will take wild card characters in the object, type, and zone fields. Pass an array to hold the resulting addresses and pass the maximum number of addresses that you want and LookUpName will try to fill it for you. Unfortunately, the 'array' of addresses also contains the names that go with them and the whole affair is packed together so that it is harder to access the individual elements in Pascal. Not that it couldn't be done, but for our example we only look up one name to avoid this problem.

AppleTalk from MacPascal

As usual, the first task is to declare the types we will need. Our method of passing data to the various routines is to use a parameter block. This is the same block used by the file manager and the device manager. However, AppleTalk uses the fields in many new ways, and the various routines will re-use a particular field for up to four different purposes. To accomodate this we define a parameter block with variant fields. A bad problem remains. MacPascal refuses to correctly lay out byte sized fields. Observing that MacPascal will do packed arrays of char in the correct manner, and that byte sized fields always occur in pairs, we will declare them in pairs and use an array index to choose the one we want. For example, to access ATPsocket, use ATPsocket_ATPflags[0], and to access ATPflags, use ATPsocket_ATPflags[1]. A record of many variant fields is sometimes hard to refer to so I have provided a diagram of all the records we will use and the positions of the fields therein in fig. 2.

The NamesTableEntry is another problem. The lower part of this record is three strings that have been packed together. The procedure Pack3str is used to accomplish this.

As I mentioned before, our access to the AppleTalk routines will be through device manager control calls. The routines presented set the csCode correctly, then call the correct driver interface. The driver interface then sets ioRefNum correctly and requests filecall to make a control call. Filecall was presented in previous columns in this magazine. Look in the past issues, or better yet, just use it the way I do and forget how it works.

Before you can try to get the examples running you must install AppleTalk into your system file. Apple supplies an installer that will do this (but it won't work on my HyperDrive!). The Appletalk installer moves these resources into the file 'System': DRVR 9 .MPP, DRVR 10 .ATP, INIT 6, and two of type NBPC. The INIT opens the MPP driver. The NBPC types are code used for NBP.

Get_Fortune

To Get_Fortune we first must check that the drivers are opened. This is the function of ATPLoad. I adapted this from the example on page 54. Its purpose is to open both drivers if they are not already open and if the serial port is free. I wish this were not necessary. It would be better if it were just a trap in ROM that you call which returns an OS error code. Obscure system globals are checked and PBopen calls are made. Let's just assume that it works and let the hot-shots analyze its code for extra credit.

Next, we stuff Nblock in preparation for a LookUpName call. Interval and count are the time between retries and the number of times to try, respectively. Pack3str is used to set the strings in myNtable and entityPtr is set to point at the string part of myNtable (not at the beginning). RetBuffPtr and retBuffsize specify where we want a ntTuple returned, and maxToGet asks for only one to be returned. If you are following along in the book on page 76 you will note that I set the parameters in the order they are listed. Then LookUpName is called to return the first Dial-A-Fortune type it finds.

Now, myTuple will have an address in it's upper part. After we set ATPflags for once-only-mode we transfer the three part address into Sblock. There will be no message so we set reqLength and reqPointer to nothing. Moving along, we set BDSpointer to our numOfBuffs:=1 buffers. Timeoutval is the number of seconds that SendRequest will wait for a response before trying again, and retryCount is the number of times it will try before giving up. The parameter block is now filled but we first must set myBDS.buffPtr and buffSize to the address of the string reply which is where we want the fortune to be returned. After the SendRequest we examine reply and see that it does indeed contain a fortune transmitted from a Dial-A-Fortune somewhere on the network.

Send_Fortune

Send_Fortune follows Get_Fortune below but, since the upper portion of code is exactly the same as in Get_Fortune, it is not repeated. Please make note of this! The addrBlock of Sblock, when cleared, indicates to OpenATPSkt that we want it to assign a new address to us (I can't think of a situation where we would already know a valid address).

After OpenATPSocket we transfer the new address into the top (excluding the nextEntry pointer) of myNtable. Then we pack3str to fill the rest of myNtable. Ablock.ntQElPtr points to myNtable and after we specify an interval, a count, and set the verifyFlag we call RegisterName. Now, myNtable is the exclusive property of NBP, and it must not be disturbed before we RemoveName.

To prepare for GetRequest it is not necessary to set ATPsocket because it remains set from OpenATPsocket. Even though we don't expect a message in our message (it's existence is enough) we set Sblock.reqPointer and reqLength for the string buffer. Then we call GetRequest.

Three of the items that are listed on page 70 as being required for SendResponse are already set by GetRequest so those of you following along, don't be alarmed when we skip them. They are atpSocket, addrBlock, and transID. It is necessary to set the EOM bit of the ATPflags since this will be our last (and only) response. BdsPointer is set to myBDS. NumOfBuffs and bdsSize are set to one because our reply string will easily fit into one packet and one BDSelement. MyBDS is set for the string reply and then we SendResponse.

The GetRequest - SendResponse loop is repeated until the mouse button is held down after a response. After that we RemoveName and CloseATPSkt. Note that unlike Bob Denny's version, this returns the same fortune every time. We leave it to you to jazz it up with a more varied response.

So, now we have our network. Happy talking!

Get_Fortune listing:
program Apple_talk_Access;{by Alan Wootton 7/85 }
 type
  ptr = ^integer;
  strptr = ^str255;

  Bsplit = packed array[0..1] of char;

  AddrBlockRec = record
    aNet : integer;
    aNode_aSocket : Bsplit
   end;

  BDSElement = record
    buffSize : integer;
    buffPtr : ptr;
    datasize : integer;
    userbytes : longint
   end;

  BDSType = array[0..7] of BDSElement;

  NtTuple = record
    NetworkNumber : integer;
    NodeID_SocketNumber : Bsplit;
    none_ObjectName : Bsplit;
    entityname : array[0..42] of integer;
   end;

  NamesTableEntry = record
    nextEntry : ^NamesTableEntry;
    NetworkNumber : integer;
    NodeID_SocketNumber : Bsplit;
    none_ObjectName : Bsplit;
    entityname : array[0..42] of integer;
   end;

{ Parameter Block information, heavily modified for Appletalk}

  ParamBlkPtr = ^ParamBlockRec;
  ParamBlockRec = record
    qLink : Ptr;
    qType : integer;
    ioTrap : integer;
    ioCmdAddr : ptr;
    ioCompletion : ptr;
    reqTid : integer;
    ioNamePtr : ^str255;{ also UserData }
    ioVrefnum : integer;
    ioRefNum : integer;
    csCode : integer;
    case integer of
     0 : (
       ATPSocket_ATPFlags : Bsplit;
       AddrBlock : AddrBlockrec;
       ReqLength : integer;
       Reqpointer : ptr;
       BDSpointer : ^BDSelement;
       numofBuffs_timeoutVal : Bsplit;
       numofResps_retrycount : Bsplit
     );
     1 : (
       curRBitmap_ATPflags : Bsplit;
       dummy1 : longint;
       confirmAddr : ptr;
       dummy2 : array[0..2] of integer;
       bitMap_BDSsize : Bsplit;
       transID : integer
     );
     2 : (
       interval_count : Bsplit;
       ntQElPtr : ^namesTableEntry;
       verifyFlag_none : Bsplit;
       dummy3 : integer;
       newSocket_none : Bsplit;
       dummy4 : longint;
       rspNum_none : Bsplit
     );
     3 : (
       dummy5 : integer;
       entityPtr : ^char;{ actually three packed str's }
       retBuffPtr : ptr;
       retbuffsize : integer;
       maxtoget : integer;
       numgotten : integer
     )
   end;

{common OS trap code}
{This nasty little piece is used to make the PBxx calls}
{described in the File Manager and the Device Manager}
{chapters of Inside Mac.  This is covered in detail in }
{MacTutor vol.1 no. 6, and also no.7 }  
 function filecall (Pb : ParamBlkPtr;
         trap : integer) : integer;{ OSError }
  var
   d0, a0 : longint;
   access : array[0..12] of integer;
 begin
  stuffHex(@access, '2848548C41FA000C309F245F265F20522013FFFF224826804ED4');
  a0 := ord(pb);
  inlineP($4E75, @d0, @a0, trap, @access);
  filecall := loword(d0);
 end;

{Given a pointer and three strings, pack them }
{end to end starting at the pointer }
 procedure pack3str (strP : strptr;
         s1, s2, s3 : str255);
 begin
  strP^ := s1;
  strP := pointer(ord(strP) + length(strP^) + 1);
  strP^ := s2;
  strP := pointer(ord(strP) + length(strP^) + 1);
  strP^ := s3;
 end;

{Open the drivers '.MPP', and '.ATP' if they are }
{not already open, and if the serial port is free. } 
{To understand this search high and low for } 
{descriptions of PortBUse, and SPConfig, which }
{are system globals (I'm still not totally sure how }
{these work).  }

function ATPLoad : integer;{ OSError }
  type
   r = record
     use : char;
    end;
  var
   pblock : ParamBlockRec;
   Tstr : str255;
   PortBUseP : ^r;
   SPConfigP : ^char;
   err : integer;
 begin
  pBlock.ioNamePtr := @Tstr;
  pBlock.dummy5 := 0;{ ioPermssn }
  PortBUseP := pointer($291);
  SPConfigP := pointer($1FB);
  with PortBUseP^ do
   begin
    writeln(' PortBuse is ', ord(use));
    if ord(use) > 127 then
     begin
      err := -98;{ assume portNotCf }
      if (ord(SPConfigP^) mod 16) < 2 then
       begin
        Tstr := '.MPP';
        err := filecall(@pBlock, $A000);{ open }
       end
     end
    else if (ord(use) mod 16) <> 1 then
     err := -97;{  PortInUse }
    if (not odd((ord(use) div 16))) and (err = 0) then
     begin
      Tstr := '.ATP';
      err := filecall(@pBlock, $A000);{ open }
     end;
   end;{ of with }
  ATPLoad := err;
 end;{ of function }

 function ATPcall (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.ioRefNum := -11;
  ATPcall := filecall(Pb, $A004);{ control }
 end;

 function OpenATPSkt (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 254;
  OpenATPSkt := ATPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function CloseATPSkt (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 250;
  CloseATPSkt := ATPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function SendRequest (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 255;
  SendRequest := ATPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function GetRequest (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 253;
  GetRequest := ATPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function SendResponse (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 252;
  SendResponse := ATPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function MPPcall (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.ioRefNum := -10;
  MPPcall := filecall(Pb, $A004);{ control }
 end;

 function RegisterName (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 253;
  RegisterName := MPPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function LookupName (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 251;
  LookupName := MPPcall(Pb);
 end;

 function RemoveName (Pb : ParamBlkPtr) : integer;
 begin
  Pb^.csCode := 252;
  RemoveName := MPPcall(Pb);
 end;
{ Above portion should be copied to Send_Fortune also.}

 procedure Get_Fortune;
  var
   Nblock, Sblock : ParamBlockRec;
   myNtable : NamesTableEntry;
   myTuple : ntTuple;
   myBDS : BDStype;
   strP : strptr;
   err : integer;
   reply : str255;
 begin
  if ATPLoad = 0 then
   begin
    with Nblock do
     begin
      interval_count[0] := chr(1);
      interval_count[1] := chr(32);
      strP := pointer(ord(           
                              @myNtable.none_ObjectName[1]));
      pack3str(strP, '=', 'Dial-A-Fortune', '=');
      entityPtr := pointer(ord(
                              @myNtable.none_ObjectName[1]));
      retBuffptr := pointer(ord(@myTuple));
      retBuffsize := sizeof(myTuple);
      maxToGet := 1;{ if larger use array of tuples}
      err := LookupName(@Nblock);
      writeln('lookup err', err);
     end;{ of with Nblock }
    if err = 0 then
     with Sblock do
      with myTuple do
       begin
        ATPsocket_ATPFlags[1] := chr(32);{atpXObit}
        addrBlock.aNet := networkNumber;
        addrBlock.aNode_Asocket[0] := 
                                            nodeID_SocketNumber[0];
        addrBlock.aNode_Asocket[1] := 
                                            nodeID_SocketNumber[1];
        reqLength := 0;{no request data}
        reqPointer := nil;
        bdsPointer := @myBDS;
        numOfBuffs_timeoutval[0] := chr(1);{buffers}
        numOfBuffs_timeoutval[1] := chr(2);{ seconds }
        numOfResps_retryCount[1] := chr(3);{ tries }
        myBDS[0].buffsize := 256;
        myBDS[0].buffPtr := pointer(ord(@reply));
        err := SendRequest(@Sblock);
        writeln('request err', err);
        writeln('fortune returned is - ', reply);
       end;
   end
  else
   writeln('Appletalk open error ', ATPLoad);
 end;

begin { main main main main main main }
 showtext;
 Get_Fortune;
end.
Send_Fortune listing:
note:upper portion is the same as Get_Fortune.
Copy and attach that portion to this.

 procedure Send_Fortune;
  var
   Ablock, Sblock : ParamBlockRec;
   myNtable : NamesTableEntry;
   myBDS : BDStype;
   strP : strptr;
   err : integer;
   buffer, reply : str255;
 begin
  reply := 'You will live long and prosper';
  if ATPLoad = 0 then
   begin
    Sblock.addrBlock.Anet := 0;
    Sblock.addrBlock.Anode_Asocket[0] := chr(0);
    Sblock.addrBlock.Anode_Asocket[1] := chr(0);
    Sblock.atpSocket_atpFlags[0] := chr(0);
    err := OpenATPSkt(@Sblock);
    writeln('open skt err', err);
    writeln('socket',      
                            ord(Sblock.atpSocket_atpFlags[0]));
    myNtable.nodeID_SocketNumber[1] := 
                                     Sblock.atpSocket_atpFlags[0];
    strP := 
            pointer(ord(@myNtable.none_ObjectName[1]));
    pack3str(strP, 
               'MacPascal Fortunes', 'Dial-A-Fortune', '*');
    Ablock.ntQElPtr := @myNtable;
    Ablock.interval_count[0] := chr(1);
    Ablock.interval_count[1] := chr(32);
    Ablock.verifyFlag_none[0] := chr(255);
    err := RegisterName(@Ablock);
    writeln('register err', err);
    if err = 0 then
     begin
      writeln('Sending fortunes, press mouse to quit');
      repeat{ send fortunes }
       begin
        Sblock.reqPointer := pointer(ord(@buffer));
        Sblock.reqLength := 256;
        err := GetRequest(@Sblock);
        writeln('get err', err);

        
        Sblock.ATPsocket_ATPflags[1] := chr(16);
           {ATPEomBit}
        Sblock.bdsPointer := @myBDS;
        Sblock.numofbuffs_timeoutval[0] := chr(1);
        Sblock.bitmap_bdssize[1] := chr(1);
        myBDS[0].buffPtr := pointer(ord(@reply));
        myBDS[0].dataSize := length(reply);
        myBDS[0].buffsize := 256;
        err := SendResponse(@Sblock);
        writeln('send err', err);
       end
      until button;
      Ablock.entityPtr := 
            pointer(ord(@myNtable.none_ObjectName[1]));
      err := RemoveName(@Ablock);
      writeln('remve err', err);
      err := CloseATPSkt(@Sblock);
      writeln('close SKT err', err);
     end;
   end
  else
   writeln('Appletalk open error ', ATPLoad);
 end;

begin { main main main main }
 showtext;
 Send_Fortune;
end.
 

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OnyX is a multifunction utility that you can use to verify the startup disk and the structure of its system files, to run miscellaneous maintenance and cleaning tasks, to configure parameters in the... Read more
macOS Catalina 10.15.5 - An Operating Sy...
macOS Catalina gives you more of everything you love about Mac. Experience three all-new media apps: Apple Music, Apple TV, and Apple Podcasts. Locate a missing Mac with the new Find My app. And now... Read more
macOS High Sierra Security Updates 10.13...
macOS High Sierra introduces new core technologies that improve the most important functions of your Mac. From rearchitecting how it stores your data to improving the efficiency of video streaming to... Read more
Numi 3.28 - Menu-bar calculator supports...
Numi is a calculator that magically combines calculations with text, and allows you to freely share your computations. Numi combines text editor and calculator Support plain English. For example, '5... Read more

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Steam Link Spotlight - Signs of the Sojo...
Steam Link Spotlight is a feature where we look at PC games that play exceptionally well using the Steam Link app. Our last entry was XCOM: Chimera Squad. Read about how it plays using Steam Link's new mouse and keyboard support over here. | Read more »
Steampunk Tower 2, DreamGate's sequ...
Steampunk Tower 2 is a DreamGate's follow up to their previous tower defence game. It's available now for both iOS and Android as a free-to-play title and will see players defending their lone base by kitting it out with a variety of turrets. [... | Read more »
Clash Royale: The Road to Legendary Aren...
Supercell recently celebrated its 10th anniversary and their best title, Clash Royale, is as good as it's ever been. Even for lapsed players, returning to the game is as easy as can be. If you want to join us in picking the game back up, we've put... | Read more »
Pokemon Go Fest 2020 will be a virtual e...
Niantic has announced that Pokemon Go Fest will still take place this year although understandably it won't be a physical event. Instead, it will become a virtual celebration and is set to be held on 25th and 26th July. [Read more] | Read more »
Marvel Future Fight's major May upd...
Marvel Future Fight's latest update has now landed, and it sounds like a big one. The focus this time around is on Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy, and it introduces all-new characters, quests, and uniforms for players to collect. [Read more] | Read more »
SINoALICE, Yoko Taro and Pokelabo's...
Yoko Taro and developer Pokelabo's SINoALICE has now opened for pre-registration over on the App Store. It's already amassed 1.5 million Android pre-registrations, and it's currently slated to launch on July 1st. [Read more] | Read more »
Masketeers: Idle Has Fallen's lates...
Masketeers: Idle Has Fallen is the latest endeavour from Appxplore, the folks behind Crab War, Thor: War of Tapnarok and Light A Way. It's an idle RPG that's currently available for Android in Early Access and will head to iOS at a later date. [... | Read more »
Evil Hunter Tycoon celebrates 2 million...
Evil Hunter Tycoon has proved to be quite the hit since launching back in March, with its most recent milestone being 2 million downloads. To celebrate the achievement, developer Super Planet has released a new updated called Darkness' Front Yard... | Read more »
Peak's Edge is an intriguing roguel...
Peak's Edge is an upcoming roguelike puzzle game from developer Kenny Sun that's heading for both iOS and Android on June 4th as a free-to-play title. It will see players rolling a pyramid shape through a variety of different levels. [Read more] | Read more »
Clash Royale: The Road to Legendary Aren...
Supercell recently celebrated its 10th anniversary and their best title, Clash Royale, is as good as it's ever been. Even for lapsed players, returning to the game is as easy as can be. If you want to join us in picking the game back up, we've put... | Read more »

Price Scanner via MacPrices.net

New 16″ MacBook Pros now on sale for up to $2...
Apple reseller DataVision is now offering new 16″ Apple MacBook Pros for up to $255 off MSRP, each including free shipping. Prices start at $2194. DataVision charges sales tax for NY, NJ, PA, and CA... Read more
Apple now offering Certified Refurbished iPho...
Apple is now offering Certified Refurbished iPhone Xr models in the refurbished section of their online store starting at $499. Each iPhone comes with Apple’s standard one-year warranty, ships free,... Read more
Sale! Get a 10.2″ 32GB WiFi iPad for only $27...
Walmart has new 10.2″ 32GB WiFi iPads on sale for $50 off Apple’s MSRP, only $279. These are the same iPads sold by Apple in their retail and online stores. Be sure to select Walmart as the seller... Read more
Apple resellers offer new 2020 Mac minis for...
Apple resellers are offering new 2020 Mac minis for up to $50 off Apple’s MSRP with prices available starting at $759. Shipping is free: (1) B&H Photo: – 2020 4-Core Mac mini: $759 $40 off MSRP... Read more
Sprint is offering the Apple iPhone 11 free t...
Did you miss out on Sprint’s recent free iPhone SE promotion? No worries. Sprint has the 64GB iPhone 11 available for $0 per month for new lines when you trade-in a qualifying phone in any condition... Read more
Apple has clearance 2019 13″ 1.4GHz MacBook P...
Apple has Certified Refurbished 2019 13″ 1.4GHz 4-Core Touch Bar MacBook Pros available today starting at $979 and up to $440 off original MSRP. Apple’s one-year warranty is included, shipping is... Read more
Apple restocks 2019 MacBook Airs starting at...
Apple has clearance, Certified Refurbished, 2019 13″ MacBook Airs available again starting at $779. Each MacBook features a new outer case, comes with a standard Apple one-year warranty, and is... Read more
Apple restocks clearance Mac minis for only $...
Apple has restocked Certified Refurbished 2018 4-Core Mac minis for only $599. Each mini comes with a new outer case plus a standard Apple one-year warranty. Shipping is free: – 3.6GHz Quad-Core... Read more
Apple’s new 2020 13″ MacBook Airs on sale for...
B&H Photo has Apple’s new 2020 13″ 4-Core and 6-Core MacBook Airs on sale today for $50-$100 off Apple’s MSRP, starting at $949. Expedited shipping is free to many addresses in the US. The... Read more
B&H continues to offer clearance 2019 13″...
B&H Photo has clearance 2019 13″ 4-Core MacBook Pros available for up to $300 off Apple’s original MSRP, with prices starting at $1149. Expedited shipping is free to many addresses in the US. B... Read more

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Security Officer - *Apple* Store - NANA (Un...
**Security Officer \- Apple Store** **Description** About NMS Built on a culture of safety and integrity, NMSdelivers award\-winning, integrated support services to Read more
Transition Into Practice Program (TIP) - Sept...
…Academy-Transition into Practice (TIP) Residency program at St Mary Medical Center in Apple Valley, CA. **We are seekingRegistered Nurses who are:** + New graduate Read more
Essbase Developer - *Apple* - Theorem, LLC...
Job Summary Apple is seeking an experienced, detail-minded Essbase developer to join our worldwide business development and strategy team. If you are someone who Read more
Senior Software Engineer @ *Apple* - Theore...
Job Summary Apple is looking for a seasoned senior software engineer to join our worldwide business development and strategy team. This is an opportunity to lead a Read more
Cub Foods - *Apple* Valley - Now Hiring Par...
Cub Foods - Apple Valley - Now Hiring Part Time! United States of America, Minnesota, Apple Valley Retail Operations Post Date May 18, 2020 Requisition # 119230 Read more
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